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  • #31
    RobertArchibald wrote: View Post
    This is a little ignorant. I don't know what you do for a living but I'm willing to wager you didn't excel at it in your first year, let alone your first five years. 10,000 hours of practice is needed in order to master something. That means 10,000 hours of repeating an action perfectly (which at 8 hours a day equates to...you guessed it, "half a goddamn decade") This also does not include all the practice time that was spent ingraining poor habits. Just because you are a professional does not mean you are the BEST professional. This is why someone like DeMar is highly regarded for his work ethic and his desire to improve. Not everyone is LeBron James.
    Hm yeah i overreacted a little bit, I have those moments sometimes. Regardless I still disagree. I think that if you're going to be in a business where you're making overwhelmingly large sums of money while being watched by thousands of people every night for the next 15 years of your life while playing at the highest level possible... you should at least have honed your skills to a level where someone could call it a standout strength, or even an advantage.

    Poor habits are inherited from poor training and/or coaching, that is the player's fault, and it is their responsibility to fix it, otherwise they plummet into mediocrity or lose their job. Or even worse, get traded to the Bobcats.

    As far as that last bit goes, I don't buy it. Not everyone can be as good Lebron James, but anyone can want to be as good as him, and be the best player they can be before a franchise invests years in your development, along with the fans watching.

    Prospects nowadays are mostly being drafted purely on potential, now while there are exceptions, it was definitely not like this before.

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    • #32
      Sig wrote: View Post
      I'm getting tired and a little annoyed at this "development", "raw skillset", and "give him some more time" bullshit.

      For fucks sake if you're going to be in the the NBA and have zero defining skillsets as a P-R-O-F-E-S-S-I-O-N-A-L basketball player playing for the highest level basketball league in the world, then why are you even here?!

      What good is a player to a team that needs half a goddamn decade to finally get good at more than one thing and contribute effectively?
      Possibly the second worst post I've read here today. You realize that pretty much every nba player comes into their full stride generally 4-5 years (aka half a decade) into their professional career right? Not everyone is Michael Jordan or lebron, buddy.

      Players before weren't drafted for their potential? I'm confused. Did you just start watching basketball last week or something?
      Last edited by iblastoff; Sat Apr 13th, 2013, 12:49 AM.

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      • #33
        iblastoff wrote: View Post
        Possibly the second worst post I've read here today. You realize that pretty much every nba player comes into their full stride generally 4-5 years (aka half a decade) into their professional career right? Not everyone is Michael Jordan or lebron, buddy.

        Players before weren't drafted for their potential? I'm confused. Did you just start watching basketball last week or something?
        Like I wrote earlier, I overreacted a little bit. But you seem to have misread something because at no point did I say that you had to be a Lebron or a Jordan. I quote, "defining skillset" is what I said. You know, something that one can use to their advantage. Now is this some sort of otherworldy Lebron-like thing that is being asked for? Absolutely not, but some of you are making it seem like it is.

        I'm going to pick on Demar again -since I watch him very often- and ask you a question. Does Demar have a single or multiple standout aspects to his game 4 years into his career? Especially considering he's going to make around $10 million dollars next season, is he worth it? Is a player that isn't even remotely close to having an all-around game worth that much cap space?

        Oh yeah, it's been 4 years. So does that mean next year he's going to improve drastically? According to most of you, his ceiling should be reached any time now. Or maybe he's like a Bargnani and needs 10 years to learn something other than shoot long two pointers (most inefficient shot in the sport of basketball) for 36 minutes. I guess this is just a Raptor fan thing, denying the obvious and inevitable.

        Also relax a little bit.

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        • #34
          Sig wrote: View Post
          Hm yeah i overreacted a little bit, I have those moments sometimes. Regardless I still disagree. I think that if you're going to be in a business where you're making overwhelmingly large sums of money while being watched by thousands of people every night for the next 15 years of your life while playing at the highest level possible... you should at least have honed your skills to a level where someone could call it a standout strength, or even an advantage.

          Poor habits are inherited from poor training and/or coaching, that is the player's fault, and it is their responsibility to fix it, otherwise they plummet into mediocrity or lose their job. Or even worse, get traded to the Bobcats.

          As far as that last bit goes, I don't buy it. Not everyone can be as good Lebron James, but anyone can want to be as good as him, and be the best player they can be before a franchise invests years in your development, along with the fans watching.

          Prospects nowadays are mostly being drafted purely on potential, now while there are exceptions, it was definitely not like this before.
          Yes poor habits come from poor training and coaching. Which is exactly what players receive before they have the luxury of NBA coaches, trainers and medical staff. It can't fall on the player to fix something they don't know HOW to fix. I think you're overlooking a large part of young player development. It doesn't happen in high school or even in their first year of college. They are getting by with physical gifts and weak opposition due to players being in the same predicament as them. When they enter the NBA they're playing against men who have years of elite experience and have learned how to improve their games.

          As for DeMar, it's easy to say he's making 10 million so he should be paying dividends in return for that money spent. BUT, he was offered that money. The onus is then on BC and his judgement of his talent. Is he worth that money? I'm not sure, but to say he has no specific skillset is unfair. He has dramatically improved his shot in many aspects (pull-up, free-throw, off-balance) and has also improved his ability to absorb contact and get to the free-throw line. For a guy who was dubbed a slasher and a jumper I'd say he's recognizing his weaknesses and working to improve a part of his game that didn't come naturally to him or he didn't need to use as much in high school and college.
          There's math, and everything else is debatable.

          @clericalbeats

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          • #35
            Sig wrote: View Post
            Hm yeah i overreacted a little bit, I have those moments sometimes. Regardless I still disagree. I think that if you're going to be in a business where you're making overwhelmingly large sums of money while being watched by thousands of people every night for the next 15 years of your life while playing at the highest level possible... you should at least have honed your skills to a level where someone could call it a standout strength, or even an advantage.

            Poor habits are inherited from poor training and/or coaching, that is the player's fault, and it is their responsibility to fix it, otherwise they plummet into mediocrity or lose their job. Or even worse, get traded to the Bobcats.

            As far as that last bit goes, I don't buy it. Not everyone can be as good Lebron James, but anyone can want to be as good as him, and be the best player they can be before a franchise invests years in your development, along with the fans watching.

            Prospects nowadays are mostly being drafted purely on potential, now while there are exceptions, it was definitely not like this before.
            I don't necessarily agree with this, in a way, it implies when you're in the NBA, you should have no room to grow or improve. You should be the best of your best by the time you reach the NBA.

            In my opinion, almost every player in the NBA has a skill or some type of facet of the game to show for i.e athleticism, shooting, defense, etc. I don't agree with the fact that it should take a short time for someone to get better. It doesn't take only 4 years for a child to read, write, talk, count, etc. Those are skills needed to be an educated/regular human being, you progress and develop over time.
            Last edited by ReubenJRD; Sat Apr 13th, 2013, 03:37 AM.
            Twitter: @ReubenJRD NBA, Raptors writer for Daily Hive Vancouver, Toronto.

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            • #36
              THE TORONTO (long)TWO POINTERS

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              • #37
                So... is Ross the best option to find a shooter?

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