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Hansbrough Will Surprise You

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  • #46
    It's Bleacher Report. It's always awful. David Lee is probably one of the worst defensive PFs in the league and they have him at 10. If you watch him play, he's just dreadful. He makes Bargnani look like Bill Russell. Kevin Love is also pretty bad as he easily gets caught flatfooted. Zach Randolph is really not that good. Neither is Nene anymore. Some of the choices make sense...Some of them have no business being htere at all.

    I don't think Tyler's a bad defensive player, but I do think Amir is an all around better defender. Tyler can defend PFs in the post, and is not horribly slow by any means so he's a decent pick'n'roll defender. I don't think he's quite as quick as Amir though, and he's not as long, making it hard for him to guard Cs or be an anchor in the middle for the team's D. Given Jonas will still be adjusting this year, I see it as only natural to put the more versatile and better team defender beside him to start games so that the team's D is as good as possible. And again, I also think Tyler will benefit offensively from coming off the bench.

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    • #47
      white men can't jump wrote: View Post
      I don't think Tyler's a bad defensive player, but I do think Amir is an all around better defender.
      If you run a comparison on Synergy, Tyler's defensive ranking is #14 among all players in the league, Amir comes in at #214. The reason is that teams had a very low shooting percentage when Hansbrough was involved. On post-ups, which were 27.6% of the plays, teams shot only 30%, while turning it over 11.3% of the time. Johnson was posted up 31% of the time, but teams shot 41.3%, with a comparable 11.9% turnover rate.

      http://www.mysynergysports.com/

      Now, I am not going to argue that Hansbrough is a top defender in the NBA, but he is a very good one, whereas Johnson is merely average. Last season, Johnson had a big advantage on offense, with a true shooting percentage of 59.7% versus an average of 52.6% for Hansbrough. Johnson ranks 56 in offense, versus a middling 245 for Hansbrough.

      It will be fun watching Toronto and seeing both these guys, who are both quality players.

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      • #48
        caccia wrote: View Post
        If you run a comparison on Synergy, Tyler's defensive ranking is #14 among all players in the league, Amir comes in at #214. The reason is that teams had a very low shooting percentage when Hansbrough was involved. On post-ups, which were 27.6% of the plays, teams shot only 30%, while turning it over 11.3% of the time. Johnson was posted up 31% of the time, but teams shot 41.3%, with a comparable 11.9% turnover rate.

        http://www.mysynergysports.com/

        Now, I am not going to argue that Hansbrough is a top defender in the NBA, but he is a very good one, whereas Johnson is merely average. Last season, Johnson had a big advantage on offense, with a true shooting percentage of 59.7% versus an average of 52.6% for Hansbrough. Johnson ranks 56 in offense, versus a middling 245 for Hansbrough.

        It will be fun watching Toronto and seeing both these guys, who are both quality players.
        Yes, but metrics to measure D are very poorly developed because you can't truly isolate a player's impact on that end. There are team/usage aspects which seriously skew what the data means. Tyler was on the 2nd unit and played less minutes than Amir, meaning he often faced worse competition in the post and for less time (energy is a huge factor on D, which is very exhausting). And he was on a better defensive team. How does that affect a post-up you ask, which is pretty isolated? No play in basketball is isolated. If your teammates are better at cheating off their men to back you up and clog up potential driving lanes , it very heavily impacts how the opponent will try to score on a post-up. This as opposed to Amir, where basically no one ever had his back, especially at the times when Bargs was on the floor. The team you're on affects D way more than it affects O, at least in terms of measures.

        And offense is also skewed by stats. It's very good at measuring what a guy does well, but it doesn't do justice to the importance of role and how a guy is used situationally. Amir is a limited offensive player who's worked really hard to make sure he's pretty damn good at the limited things he can do. Tyler could still use some improvements in efficiency, but he brings a different dimension where he can be used in more situations. I mean, you really don't want Amir shooting except open jumpers and as the roll man on the p'n'r. I still cringe every time he puts the ball on the floor to post up or drive. But the fact that Tyler's a bit better with the ball in his hands, and also at being strong to establish low position means the offense has more options, not just through him, but also in how it can create spacing in general. And I didn't even mention yet the impact running plays with Jose/Kyle as your PG instead of DJ Augustin will have on your scoring game.

        In the end the measures are funny, because I'd suggest they're reflective of a common issue on both ends. Amir is more efficient on O, but it's because he generally tries to do (or is asked to do) less things. This doesn't make him a better offensive player, it makes him more efficient. And similarly on D, one reason Tyler measures out better because he's not asked to do as much. He rarely is asked to guard an obvious mismatch in the post like taking a bigger/longer player, since they had Hibbert and Mahinmi to man the C spot. Amir was frequently used as the primary C for stretches because of injuries or foul trouble. That'll make your post D look a lot worse than it actually is. And he often did a fairly good job despite any mismatch. I doubt Tyler would have had as much success.

        Anyway, this can be beaten around a lot, but I'd still say that Amir is a better defensive player all things considered, and that Tyler is a better offensive player, even if stats might suggest the opposite.

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        • #49
          OldSchool wrote: View Post


          Even coach Vogel, who had a good view of it all, immediately stood up pointed out Hansbrough and benched him 3 seconds later (really respect coach Vogel for that btw, benching a player for dirty plays even if its his own player)
          You decide.
          I think Tyler was upset at Jonas for running at him and pushing him away, so he grabbed Jonas' arm and said get off me.
          -"You canít run from me. I mean, my heart donít bleed Kool-Aid."
          -"ďI ainít no diva! I donít have no blond hair, red hair. Iím Reggie Evans.Ē

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