Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Everything Coronavirus

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • G__Deane wrote: View Post
    Question:
    How many posters here personally know someone who has had COVID?
    Not the teller at the bank (we had one here in our city 3 months ago and none since), not some people in a nursing home you read in the paper (there was a single case here she got it in a hospital visit, quarantined and no one further), but you personally know.

    My daughter's friend had it (diagnosal confirmation) but very mild symptoms. Her live-in boyfriend didn't catch it from her and they're hours from here in London, ON
    Both my in laws had it. Full recovery thankfully. One had it worse than the other.

    Comment


    • S.R. wrote: View Post

      Uncle died from it. In his 70's but otherwise generally healthy.
      i'm sorry for your loss dude.

      Comment


      • G__Deane wrote: View Post
        Question:
        How many posters here personally know someone who has had COVID?
        Not the teller at the bank (we had one here in our city 3 months ago and none since), not some people in a nursing home you read in the paper (there was a single case here she got it in a hospital visit, quarantined and no one further), but you personally know.

        My daughter's friend had it (diagnosal confirmation) but very mild symptoms. Her live-in boyfriend didn't catch it from her and they're hours from here in London, ON
        A colleague of mine had it, but symptoms seemed mild and she fully recovered. I don't think her daughters caught it.

        Comment


        • S.R. wrote: View Post

          Uncle died from it. In his 70's but otherwise generally healthy.
          Sorry for your loss. Prayer up for his family.

          Comment


          • S.R. wrote: View Post

            Uncle died from it. In his 70's but otherwise generally healthy.
            I am so sorry for your loss S.R.

            Comment


            • Most everything's opening back up on Friday here. Looks like coronas death grip on society is loosening. It's still gonna be a loooong time until many industries recover, many companies won't. And the line ups and the masks and the plexiglas are here to stay for quite some time, plus the mental toll its taken on many..the handshake and the hug have become something to fear for a portion of the population.

              all in all though, looks like we mitigated a lot of deaths we were hearing would be inevitable in March and early April
              It's Klaw Season. Time to hunt.

              Comment


              • KeonClark wrote: View Post
                ...all in all though, looks like we mitigated a lot of deaths we were hearing would be inevitable in March and early April
                And caused a lot of them by ignoring the segment of the population with the least defenses against it. Yeah, this is Monday morning quarterbacking, but paid professionals in charge of the healthcare of seniors in long term care and retirement homes suddenly forgot that their immune systems were degraded by virtue of their age? That's like the fire department being okay with storing gasoline in unprotected wooden sheds that are frequented by smokers. Hard to believe it happened after the fact.

                If it hadn't been for almost criminal processes and procedures in those long term care facilities, what would the death toll have actually been?

                Nevermind, I just looked it up. Looks like 97% of deaths in Canada occurred in members of the population that were 60 years old or older. A total of 7,900 deaths, and only 237 of them among people under 60. For this the country was locked down for 3 months.

                Like I say, Monday morning quaterbacking is easy but Damn. You would think this could have been figured out a little better.

                Comment


                • KeonClark wrote: View Post
                  Most everything's opening back up on Friday here. Looks like coronas death grip on society is loosening. It's still gonna be a loooong time until many industries recover, many companies won't. And the line ups and the masks and the plexiglas are here to stay for quite some time, plus the mental toll its taken on many..the handshake and the hug have become something to fear for a portion of the population.

                  all in all though, looks like we mitigated a lot of deaths we were hearing would be inevitable in March and early April
                  A lot of places downtown are still closed, so hopefully they will open next week. I think a bigger problem is whether the punters are there. Some of the places on 8th avenue have decent crowds but others were empty/near empty and once you got off Stephen avenue it was really, really quiet. Was talking to one manager and they are losing money everyday but are more afraid of being shut.

                  I know that a lot of offices are starting to re-open (we are back on the 22nd), so that should be good for some places (pretty sure our office keeps one bar in business).

                  Comment


                  • slaw wrote: View Post

                    A lot of places downtown are still closed, so hopefully they will open next week. I think a bigger problem is whether the punters are there. Some of the places on 8th avenue have decent crowds but others were empty/near empty and once you got off Stephen avenue it was really, really quiet. Was talking to one manager and they are losing money everyday but are more afraid of being shut.

                    I know that a lot of offices are starting to re-open (we are back on the 22nd), so that should be good for some places (pretty sure our office keeps one bar in business).
                    Yeah, countless bars, cafes, convenience stores that are dependent on the downtown office worker, and people are trickling back, if I'm being generous. Some won't come back until "all this is over" (2021?)..some aren't coming back at all. There's a lot of small oil and gas companies that see no sense in spending 20k a month for an office anymore when they're barely getting by.
                    It's Klaw Season. Time to hunt.

                    Comment


                    • KeonClark wrote: View Post

                      Yeah, countless bars, cafes, convenience stores that are dependent on the downtown office worker, and people are trickling back, if I'm being generous. Some won't come back until "all this is over" (2021?)..some aren't coming back at all. There's a lot of small oil and gas companies that see no sense in spending 20k a month for an office anymore when they're barely getting by.
                      Big ones, too. Had lunch with a banker yesterday and their offices are not fully re-opening until 2021, which seems absolutely insane to me but a lot of the bigger companies are going to have serious liability concerns and likely don't want to engage their entire workforce only to be shutting down again in October. I do get the sense that the service firms are coming back. I know at our place there was a big push as a lot of us felt an obligation to get back downtown to support businesses, jobs, etc.

                      As I've said before though, an avalanche is coming. Lots of businesses and other organizations are going under and not coming back. The devastation of this hasn't been felt yet and that's not even mentioning the universities (big trouble is coming there when 20% of their students don't show up in September to have internet classes). In particular, Calgary is fucked. The lack of leadership and planning at the local level and determination of the federal government to destroy us, together with this lockdown, is going to transform this city and not for the better.

                      Comment


                      • We have 17 offices across Canada. One of my tasks has been to amalgamate some offices from an acquisition we did, as we laid off some staff and then allow others to work from home more and/or permanently. Then re-negotiate rents rather than close others as we navigate the pandemic.

                        Most/all of my clients are major corporations with 400-1000 locations and tens of thousands of employees. Virtually all of them are essential services and reamijn open to the public but none of them have their head offices fully open. One I know of in particular only has their CEO in every day and he doesn't even make that known so others in the Management team don't feel pressured to go in.

                        None have a back-to-work-as-normal plan yet. I see status-quo until Sept at earliest. That's not to say that a lot of work can't be done, virtual meetings held, contracts signed etc. But that won't help the bars, restaurants and millions of small businesses that rely on "normal". I personally have no plans to be on a plane, go to a packed restaurant or see a live sporting event until the Fall but will support smaller local businesses to the best of my ability.

                        Instead we hear about a shift to punishing CERB (costs now pegged at ~$60B in new DEBT) cheats instead of helping the economy beyond handing out fake money that doesn't exist.

                        Comment


                        • PS gas is now back at $1/litre so people commuting to work will be as expensive as ever.

                          You know who likes COVID? Walmart, Amazon and pizza conglomerates ....

                          Comment


                          • So I'm hearing if you got too much CERB you'll be fined 300% of what you took or serve 6 months in jail? god damn
                            Only one thing matters: We The Champs.

                            Comment


                            • KeonClark wrote: View Post

                              Yeah, countless bars, cafes, convenience stores that are dependent on the downtown office worker, and people are trickling back, if I'm being generous. Some won't come back until "all this is over" (2021?)..some aren't coming back at all. There's a lot of small oil and gas companies that see no sense in spending 20k a month for an office anymore when they're barely getting by.
                              Here in B.C we have been about 2-3 weeks into business coming back. About 1/4 place that look like they were operating had for lease signs up on buildings. I just went to an outdoors store that was having a liquidation sale, they are getting rid of retail and just doing tours and rentals. Prices at one of my favorite mexican spots are up about 4 dollars a meal to deal with the 50% capacity. Even the places who survived i dont know if the 50% of business is going to be enough to keep them alive.
                              I went to like 5 of my favorite spots this past week and am keeping my eyes open for some business that are having big sales trying to get people to come in the store.
                              To be the champs you got to beat the champs

                              Comment


                              • Puffer wrote: View Post

                                And caused a lot of them by ignoring the segment of the population with the least defenses against it. Yeah, this is Monday morning quarterbacking, but paid professionals in charge of the healthcare of seniors in long term care and retirement homes suddenly forgot that their immune systems were degraded by virtue of their age? That's like the fire department being okay with storing gasoline in unprotected wooden sheds that are frequented by smokers. Hard to believe it happened after the fact.

                                If it hadn't been for almost criminal processes and procedures in those long term care facilities, what would the death toll have actually been?

                                Nevermind, I just looked it up. Looks like 97% of deaths in Canada occurred in members of the population that were 60 years old or older. A total of 7,900 deaths, and only 237 of them among people under 60. For this the country was locked down for 3 months.

                                Like I say, Monday morning quaterbacking is easy but Damn. You would think this could have been figured out a little better.
                                It's true that there's some hindsight benefit Puffer, but at the same time, there was also very early data pointing this to be something that was extremely heavily skewed towards the elderly and people with co-conditions. 97% is a massive number that doesn't get anywhere near as much attention as it should. Matter of fact os vastly ignored, and pushed under the carpet.

                                Instead of focusing on a targeted, efficient, and zoomed-in approach to where the problem really is (the 97%), we chose to shut down schools, parks and businesses, throw the vast majority of the workforce out of their livelihood, then throw public money at the general direction of the problem. The tangible and intangible cost of that was (and will continue to be) astronomical.

                                If they picked up a 10th of that cost and used it to improve the quality/oversight of eldercare (and the overall healthcare system), while leaving the rest of us working and in better position to also support our own elderly parents and families, we'd be much better off as a society (both economically and in terms of health).

                                But that's what you get when we act based on fear rather than facts and data. We chose that path as a society, to shut up and run for the hills when they said it would kill millions in North America and overrun every single hospital. So at this juncture there's not much we can do, other than wait for the bill and hopefully learn something for the future.



                                2019 NBA Champions. Glad to have doubted the doubters.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X