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  • So thankful for the experts and leadership here in Vancouver/BC. All the parks have basically remained open (except, I think, Provincial Parks for camping at the beginning). Outside people give space on the street when possible, and older folk are quite comfortable sans mask when walking on the seawall, in parks etc. Inside people are happy to mask when asked, even if more could when in voluntary places like most grocery stores.

    But it isn't politicized here and people are fully on board with Bonnie Henry - now a Canadian public health legend - and whichever way her guidance goes. If she tells BC the virus is back upon us and it's to step up our mask game, we will. Thank goodness.
    Last edited by SkywalkerAC; Mon Jul 6th, 2020, 05:04 PM.

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    • SkywalkerAC wrote: View Post
      So thankful for the experts and leadership here in Vancouver/BC. All the parks have basically remained open (except, I think, Provincial Parks for camping at the beginning). Outside people give space on the street when possible, and older folk are quite comfortable sans mask when walking on the seawall, in parks etc. Inside people are happy to mask when asked, even if more could when in voluntary places like most grocery stores.

      But it isn't politicized here and people are fully on board with Bonnie Henry - now a Canadian public health legend - and whichever way her guidance goes. If she tells BC the virus is back upon us and it's to step up our mask game, we will. Thank goodness.
      Alberta is doing great too, the supposed conservative heartland.

      so Americans try to make it a political left vs right issue.. but it's bad in California, not bad in Alberta.. this is an America problem.
      It's Klaw Season. Time to hunt.

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      • SkywalkerAC wrote: View Post
        So thankful for the experts and leadership here in Vancouver/BC. All the parks have basically remained open (except, I think, Provincial Parks for camping at the beginning). Outside people give space on the street when possible, and older folk are quite comfortable sans mask when walking on the seawall, in parks etc. Inside people are happy to mask when asked, even if more could when in voluntary places like most grocery stores.

        But it isn't politicized here and people are fully on board with Bonnie Henry - now a Canadian public health legend - and whichever way her guidance goes. If she tells BC the virus is back upon us and it's to step up our mask game, we will. Thank goodness.
        Yup. I've been raving about her for quite some time now. She's a legend now, especially in BC, she was even featured in a CNN story.

        Mamba Mentality

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        • Only one thing matters: We The Champs.

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          • KeonClark wrote: View Post

            Alberta is doing great too, the supposed conservative heartland.

            so Americans try to make it a political left vs right issue.. but it's bad in California, not bad in Alberta.. this is an America problem.
            Where did I can this is a conservative problem? All across this country we have trustworthy institutions and competent leadership, and a populace that overwhelmingly believes in science and expertise and good governance.

            My point was rather that when you've got public health experts leading the way out in front of the politicians, you can have everyone outside without masks in a densely populated city and feel good about it, because they are following that same guidance. Our approach to the virus wasn't divided by the hyper-partisanship nor misinformed a toxic media ecosystem, let alone by top leadership.
            Last edited by SkywalkerAC; Tue Jul 7th, 2020, 02:19 AM.

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            • SkywalkerAC wrote: View Post

              Where did I can this is a conservative problem? All across this country we have trustworthy institutions and competent leadership, and a populace that overwhelmingly believes in science and expertise and good governance.

              My point was rather that when you've got public health experts leading the way out in front of the politicians, you can have everyone outside without masks in a densely populated city and feel good about it, because they are following that same guidance. Our approach to the virus wasn't divided by the hyper-partisanship nor misinformed a toxic media ecosystem, let alone by top leadership.
              That's....also what I was saying. I was criticizing the States, not you
              It's Klaw Season. Time to hunt.

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              • This paper just came out on June 25th

                "Conclusion
                Although this is a retrospective analysis, results suggest that early diagnosis, early isolation and early treatment of COVID-19 patients, with at least 3 days of HCQ-AZ lead to a significantly better clinical outcome and a faster viral load reduction than other treatments."
                Outcomes of 3,737 COVID-19 patients treated with hydroxychloroquine/azithromycin and other regimens in Marseille, France: A retrospective analysis

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                • KeonClark wrote: View Post

                  That's....also what I was saying. I was criticizing the States, not you
                  You can't really look at this on a country-wide basis. Different parts have been affected at different times. The southern and western states were largely unaffected by the first surge whereas it now seems to have burned out other places where it basically killed everyone it was going to kill.

                  Same in Canada, Ontario and Quebec did not deal with this well at all in the first instance and got hammered. Quebec was at one point, and maybe still is, one of the worst jurisdictions in the world for deaths - I believe more than every other part of Canada combined.

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                  • slaw wrote: View Post

                    Same in Canada, Ontario and Quebec did not deal with this well at all in the first instance and got hammered. Quebec was at one point, and maybe still is, one of the worst jurisdictions in the world for deaths - I believe more than every other part of Canada combined.
                    Yeah, Quebec I believe that was directly connected to infections in long term care homes? That's what happened in Italy with the higher mortality rate too, they messed that up.

                    Melbourne is going back into shutdown mode after a recent spike in cases. It's not actually a lot of cases, but Australia's taking that 'respond quickly & severely' approach. But it sucks to see a government revert to closures. I really, really hope we don't have governments proposing 3 month shutdowns this fall or winter. Really think they have to take new data into account, be more strategic in response measures, and consider impacts beyond public health as part of the equation.
                    "We're playing in a building." -- Kawhi Leonard

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                    • Paris (AFP) - Potentially fatal COVID-19 complications in the brain including delirium, nerve damage and stroke may be more common than initially thought, a team of British-based doctors warned Wednesday.

                      Severe COVID-19 infections are known to put patients at risk of neurological complications, but research led by University College London suggests serious problems can occur even in individuals with mild cases of the virus.
                      "We identified a higher than expected number of people with neurological conditions such as brain inflammation, which did not always correlate with the severity of respiratory symptoms,"
                      "Given that the disease has only been around for a matter of months, we might not yet know what long-term damage COVID-19 can cause," said Ross Paterson from UCL's Queen Square Institute of Neurology.
                      https://news.yahoo.com/brain-problem...102940044.html

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                      • Apollo wrote: View Post

                        Paris (AFP) - Potentially fatal COVID-19 complications in the brain including delirium, nerve damage and stroke may be more common than initially thought, a team of British-based doctors warned Wednesday.

                        Severe COVID-19 infections are known to put patients at risk of neurological complications, but research led by University College London suggests serious problems can occur even in individuals with mild cases of the virus.

                        https://news.yahoo.com/brain-problem...102940044.html
                        This is why I have hope for a drug or drug combination that deals with the symptoms. A lot of the damage seems to be linked to extreme inflammation. If they can start with an inflammation lowering drug regimen as soon as it is detected, it may solve a lot of problems.

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                        • Puffer wrote: View Post

                          This is why I have hope for a drug or drug combination that deals with the symptoms. A lot of the damage seems to be linked to extreme inflammation. If they can start with an inflammation lowering drug regimen as soon as it is detected, it may solve a lot of problems.
                          Hopefully there are solutions soon. If they had something like that they would need to change some current practices if brain damage indeed does occur in mild cases.

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                          • So building herd immunity does not sound so promising. I am glad Canada opted not to experiment with that:
                            • We don't know how long coronavirus antibodies last.
                            • Recent research from Spain suggests they may disappear in some patients in a matter of weeks.
                            • Other studies suggest antibodies last a few months.
                            https://news.yahoo.com/research-coal...194200542.html

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                            • Apollo wrote: View Post
                              So building herd immunity does not sound so promising. I am glad Canada opted not to experiment with that:
                              https://news.yahoo.com/research-coal...194200542.html
                              Not disagreeing but, like all headlines of the last decade it seems, the focus is on the most negative of possibilities. the article goes on to say:

                              "White blood cells also have an impressive immunological memory that can help your body identify and attack the invading virus should it ever return. T cells can destroy infected cells, and B cells work to produce new antibodies.

                              'If you're reinfected after some time, it would be an attenuated disease. It will be not as severe as the first time because your B and T cells remember the virus and react quickly,' Krammer said.

                              Some research has even shown that not everyone who gets sick develops detectable antibodies, which suggests their response to the virus could be tied up in a different layer of the immune system.

                              But neither recent study of antibodies — in China or Spain — tested participants to see how many T cells and B cells they developed."


                              The other interesting thing that this research may impact is how it hurts getting correct data. If antibodies disappear after a few months, than antibody testing does not give a correct picture of how many people actually had the disease. There may be far more people who were asymptomatic than currently believed.

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                              • Puffer wrote: View Post

                                Not disagreeing but, like all headlines of the last decade it seems, the focus is on the most negative of possibilities. the article goes on to say:

                                "White blood cells also have an impressive immunological memory that can help your body identify and attack the invading virus should it ever return. T cells can destroy infected cells, and B cells work to produce new antibodies.

                                'If you're reinfected after some time, it would be an attenuated disease. It will be not as severe as the first time because your B and T cells remember the virus and react quickly,' Krammer said.

                                Some research has even shown that not everyone who gets sick develops detectable antibodies, which suggests their response to the virus could be tied up in a different layer of the immune system.

                                But neither recent study of antibodies — in China or Spain — tested participants to see how many T cells and B cells they developed."


                                The other interesting thing that this research may impact is how it hurts getting correct data. If antibodies disappear after a few months, than antibody testing does not give a correct picture of how many people actually had the disease. There may be far more people who were asymptomatic than currently believed.
                                Possibly but this article fails to mention other negative factors such as that fact the virus kills T cells similarly to that of HIV. The extent is still being researched but the t cells are the front line defense and once one becomes a young adult the body loses it's ability to produce significant amounts.

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