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LVSL - RAPTORS vs MAVS - 6pm

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  • grindhouse
    replied
    LVSL - RAPTORS vs MAVS - 6pm

    Superjudge wrote: View Post
    Thanks for taking the time to post the video. Any comparison can end now. I mean really guys....stop. This coboclo guy might end up a great player, but now..... well he certainly isn't anything even remotely close to the kid in the above video was when he came in.
    ^

    Bruno I mean seriously so far it seems like he has a nba first step. Doesn't know what to do after that to get to the rim against nba speed. Nice jumper .
    Moves his feet well on D doesnt know what to do with his hands.

    Most nba players start from early playing basketball and by the time they reach the nba. It's about adding to their skills and getting stronger.

    Bruno has no skills and needs to get stronger.

    When I say no skills I mean he is raw


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by grindhouse; Wed Jul 16, 2014, 10:05 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Superjudge
    replied
    Thanks for taking the time to post the video. Any comparison can end now. I mean really guys....stop. This coboclo guy might end up a great player, but now..... well he certainly isn't anything even remotely close to the kid in the above video was when he came in.

    Leave a comment:


  • MixxAOR
    replied


    nothing highlights can't fix lmao jk

    Leave a comment:


  • thead
    replied
    white men can't jump wrote: View Post
    God, seriously? These scouting snippets are always incomplete pictures of what a player does. They focus on the things they show promise in to show that a player can develop strengths. But were any of these things actual strengths for DeMar going from USC to the NBA?

    Dribbling to ball once or twice and finishing in the lane doesn't make him "plenty good". Hitting some mid-range jumpers doesn't make him a good shooter. His shot was flat and kinda ugly early in his career, and he had very limited range. He could get it off, but it wasn't good enough to build his O around until he came back in his 2nd year with improved form, especially with more lift in it giving a better arc. In his first year, his range pretty much stopped at 10-15 ft, which is awful range for a SG/SF and tough to utilize when the guy can't dribble worth a damn, because it's hard to create set plays getting him opportunities in that range.

    Put it this way, if DeMar was in this year's draft, where does he go based on what tools he had coming out of college? Probably around James Young's spot at 17 at the best-case, and as low as GR3 at 40 as his floor. In other words, a player lacking skills and who'd have to work very hard to be more than a role player.



    He was taken on upside, and not for any skills which could be obviously used to contribute to the team immediately.
    people are saying he came in raw with no skills. I'm saying he had a mid range game before he got here. I was right

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  • enlightenment
    replied
    3inthekeon wrote: View Post
    To further your point, I read a Nate Silver article on Carmelo today where he pointed out 42% of his FGA's were crunch time (8 seconds or less on the shot clock), compared to 31% league average. Silver noted "In those situations, shooting efficiency drops drastically" Checked Demar last year and he had the same 42% late clock FGA,
    Its all about context, context, context.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Great One
    replied
    thead wrote: View Post
    ahem cough



    cough cough cough



    god this cough is killing me...everytime I cough more facts come out...cough cough



    aaahhhhh cough



    DROPS MIC
    Are you ok??

    Leave a comment:


  • 3inthekeon
    replied
    enlightenment wrote: View Post
    If the majority of your midrange is at the end of a good play (Patterson), then you are likely to have a higher FG%.

    If the majority of your midrange is at the end of a broken play (Derozan), then you are likely to have a lower FG%.

    This is why comparing dry FG% at the midrange, is a terrible measure of who the better midrange shooter is. Imagine all of our broken offensive plays, and give them all to Ppat... do you think his FG% will be just as high? Demar is always the one with the ball after a broken play. Take that into account before you compare.
    To further your point, I read a Nate Silver article on Carmelo today where he pointed out 42% of his FGA's were crunch time (8 seconds or less on the shot clock), compared to 31% league average. Silver noted "In those situations, shooting efficiency drops drastically" Checked Demar last year and he had the same 42% late clock FGA,

    Leave a comment:


  • MixxAOR
    replied
    I think what people have the most problem is with Derozan's pull up midrange jumper. Not catch and shoot right? Correct if I'm wrong of course. I looked SportsVU stats on pull up jumpers

    Leave a comment:


  • white men can't jump
    replied
    God, seriously? These scouting snippets are always incomplete pictures of what a player does. They focus on the things they show promise in to show that a player can develop strengths. But were any of these things actual strengths for DeMar going from USC to the NBA?

    Dribbling to ball once or twice and finishing in the lane doesn't make him "plenty good". Hitting some mid-range jumpers doesn't make him a good shooter. His shot was flat and kinda ugly early in his career, and he had very limited range. He could get it off, but it wasn't good enough to build his O around until he came back in his 2nd year with improved form, especially with more lift in it giving a better arc. In his first year, his range pretty much stopped at 10-15 ft, which is awful range for a SG/SF and tough to utilize when the guy can't dribble worth a damn, because it's hard to create set plays getting him opportunities in that range.

    Put it this way, if DeMar was in this year's draft, where does he go based on what tools he had coming out of college? Probably around James Young's spot at 17 at the best-case, and as low as GR3 at 40 as his floor. In other words, a player lacking skills and who'd have to work very hard to be more than a role player.

    The fact that DeRozan’s jumper doesn’t have much range (he’s shooting just 2/22 from 3-point range), he cannot play pick and roll, is not a great passer, possesses just an average basketball IQ, and his understanding of how to operate in the half-court is limited, makes him a clear-cut project for the NBA. The main question is, how much he is going to improve over the next few years? The answer to that largely depends on his work ethic and character, which draws strong reviews from those around him. Some teams are not that opposed to taking a player who obviously possesses great upside, especially once you get outside of the lottery. One GM we spoke to compared him to Gerald Wallace as a freshman, saying how he was even more limited a player at the same point in his career.

    From DraftExpress.com http://www.draftexpress.com#ixzz37b70fq8N
    http://www.draftexpress.com
    He was taken on upside, and not for any skills which could be obviously used to contribute to the team immediately.

    Leave a comment:


  • thead
    replied
    white men can't jump wrote: View Post
    No, he wasn't, not from a skill set perspective. He couldn't shoot, couldn't dribble, couldn't pass (the 3 basic fundamentals of basketball) at anything resembling a high quality level for a pro...Not even close. He was drafted fully as a project, and he panned out because he busts his ass every day.
    ahem cough

    USC is doing a good job of playing to DeRozan’s strengths lately, and trying to minimize his weaknesses. They like to bring him off cuts and curls, putting him in a situation where he can dribble the ball once or twice and then elevate for a soft finish. His production is up from the last time we profiled him, and he’s making a good amount of his two-point shots (56%), while getting to the line at a decent rate. He looks smarter and more aggressive these days for sure, doing a much better job of utilizing his athleticism, which is obviously his biggest strengths. This showed up primarily in his work on the offensive glass, an area that he’s been quite effective in thanks to his size, length and leaping ability.

    From DraftExpress.com http://www.draftexpress.com#ixzz37b38s27i
    http://www.draftexpress.com
    cough cough cough

    DeRozan knocked down a number of mid-range jumpers in this game, something that he’s been doing fairly often from the film we took in after the game. His stroke looks very nice, with range out to about 18 feet, particularly when he has a moment to set his feet and get his shot off.

    From DraftExpress.com http://www.draftexpress.com#ixzz37b3QNDsV
    http://www.draftexpress.com
    god this cough is killing me...everytime I cough more facts come out...cough cough

    DeRozan compiled 63 points and 27 rebounds in three games in Los Angeles, looking far more confident and aggressive than we’d seen him at any point this season thus far. He hit a 3-pointer in every game, doubling the amount of 3-pointers he’s made, and breaking his previous record for free throw attempts in a single game (seven)

    From DraftExpress.com http://www.draftexpress.com#ixzz37b3qBcvS
    http://www.draftexpress.com
    aaahhhhh cough

    Clearly DeRozan has a solid knack for operating in the mid-range area, which should serve him well in the more spacing-friendly NBA. He’s also a good offensive rebounder—a testament to his excellent physical tools.

    From DraftExpress.com http://www.draftexpress.com#ixzz37b46sOEi
    http://www.draftexpress.com
    DROPS MIC

    Leave a comment:


  • enlightenment
    replied
    If the majority of your midrange is at the end of a good play (Patterson), then you are likely to have a higher FG%.

    If the majority of your midrange is at the end of a broken play (Derozan), then you are likely to have a lower FG%.

    This is why comparing dry FG% at the midrange, is a terrible measure of who the better midrange shooter is. Imagine all of our broken offensive plays, and give them all to Ppat... do you think his FG% will be just as high? Demar is always the one with the ball after a broken play. Take that into account before you compare.

    Leave a comment:


  • thead
    replied
    FTAs need to be factored into 2pt%

    Also if someone is a first option and forced into contested 2s in end of shot clock situations it is different then if Terrence Ross
    just ran a pick n pop with Patterson and got you a wide open baseline 2pt shot (which you better hit at a high percentage)

    Also a big's 2pt% can have a lot to do with tip ins, and low post high percentage shots.

    The situation matters

    Leave a comment:


  • white men can't jump
    replied
    Superjudge wrote: View Post
    Ok I am seeing this written more and more on this forum and I want it to stop. It isn't remotely accurate. Demar Derozan was plenty good when he came in. Plenty. Any of what you guys are starting to try to rewrite in the history books is simply fantasy.
    No, he wasn't, not from a skill set perspective. He couldn't shoot, couldn't dribble, couldn't pass (the 3 basic fundamentals of basketball) at anything resembling a high quality level for a pro...Not even close. He was drafted fully as a project, and he panned out because he busts his ass every day.

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  • Superjudge
    replied
    nah, dan is usually pretty bang on, but here, I don't buy it. But I guess I have my own biases too

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  • thead
    replied
    There are times when I feel the numbers are lying to me and I just trust my gut...this is one of those times

    Leave a comment:

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