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  • Just Is wrote: View Post
    His wife is from Toronto (if I recall correctly).
    I know that part, just wonder if she converted him or something.

    Comment


    • tDotted wrote: View Post
      So the coach has no effect on things like team defense? Interesting
      Yes, cause that's what I wrote..... come on, now.

      Obviously a coach has an impact on implementing and monitoring systems, etc. but these are largely big picture, strategic concepts worked out in the offseason and implemented during training camp and the early season. Tweaks might be made throughout the course of a season but they are largely minor because teams don't have the time to re-invent themselves in February. The idea that a team that was putrid defensively was going to be fixed with some adjustments during a playoff series in April is facile. I'm not absolving Casey of blame for the bad defense last year but that ship sailed long, long before the playoffs and tactical changes weren't going to fix it by that point.

      Larger perspective, it's often comforting and empowering to think that with a few adjustments here or there or some new bold thinking we can transform groups, teams, etc. but there are almost no examples of that working in the real world. It typically takes strategic planning, personnel changes and long lead times. In other words, the seeds of the fuck-ups from last year were planted in the offseason when certain personnel and strategic decisions were made. You don't fix problems like that with tactical brilliance....

      Comment


      • JWash wrote: View Post
        Is Zach Lowe a Raptors fan? He talks about us a lot more than other teams it seems like.
        I think we just happen to see everytime we're mentioned. He talks about nba basketball a ridiculous amount.

        Also, he calls us the drakes
        It's Klaw Season. Time to hunt.

        Comment


        • Barolt wrote: View Post
          We're an interesting team for a lot of statistical reasons. We win a lot of games, but are a statistical outlier in a lot of categories.
          Not really.

          Other than the lineups thing, the Raptors pass the sniff test of a very good team.

          - We're one of the best 3PT shooting teams in the league
          - We limit other team's 3PT attempts well
          - Efficient on offense because we take a ton of FTs and shoot 3s at a high clip
          - Defend the pick and roll very well, and in general are very good defensively
          - Have a deep roster
          - Have a near-superstar level player as well as a great all-star level partner for him (which is sort of mandatory for top teams)

          Comment


          • slaw wrote: View Post
            Yes, cause that's what I wrote..... come on, now.

            Obviously a coach has an impact on implementing and monitoring systems, etc. but these are largely big picture, strategic concepts worked out in the offseason and implemented during training camp and the early season. Tweaks might be made throughout the course of a season but they are largely minor because teams don't have the time to re-invent themselves in February. The idea that a team that was putrid defensively was going to be fixed with some adjustments during a playoff series in April is facile. I'm not absolving Casey of blame for the bad defense last year but that ship sailed long, long before the playoffs and tactical changes weren't going to fix it by that point.

            Larger perspective, it's often comforting and empowering to think that with a few adjustments here or there or some new bold thinking we can transform groups, teams, etc. but there are almost no examples of that working in the real world. It typically takes strategic planning, personnel changes and long lead times. In other words, the seeds of the fuck-ups from last year were planted in the offseason when certain personnel and strategic decisions were made. You don't fix problems like that with tactical brilliance....
            You're totally right. In 1980, when Kareem Abdul-Jabbar went down in game 5 of the NBA finals, there was nothing Paul Westhead could do to turn the series around. Clearly, an injury to the team's best player meant that the 76ers were sure to win that series.

            It would be insanity to suggest that it was a smart coaching adjustment to start a 6'8" rookie at center and have that be the key move to winning a championship.
            twitter.com/anthonysmdoyle

            Comment


            • #Don'tFireCasey

              JWash wrote: View Post
              There's this narrative here that heavy minutes are what causes injuries, and I haven't really seen any proof of that idea, while on the other hand there is a fair bit of evidence to the contrary (going back and looking at the guys who've played the heaviest minutes per game in the league every year, there doesn't appear to be much correlation between that and getting injured).
              I think there is more evidence in support than against.

              2012 From ESPN
              http://espn.go.com/blog/truehoop/pos...-title-chances

              "3,000 minutes in a regular season means not missing a game in an 82-game season, while playing a mighty 37 minutes every outing.

              Somehow, this is quite common: Over the last 20 years, players have passed that high bar an incredible 324 times. And beginning with the era of Michael Jordan's Bulls, such players commonly won titles -- 11 of 13 champions starred iron men in the 3,000 club, very often Jordan himself.

              But something changed in the NBA about the time Larry Brown's Pistons won the title. Over the last seven years, since Ben Wallace in 2004, NBA players have played beyond the 3,000-minute mark in the regular season nearly 100 times. The players who have done that are essentially a who's who of NBA studs. The vast majority are All-Stars, and many have won titles. The names include LeBron James, Dwight Howard, Derrick Rose, Kobe Bryant, Dwyane Wade, Dirk Nowitzki, Kevin Garnett, Chris Paul, Kevin Durant, Pau Gasol, Blake Griffin, Paul Pierce, Ray Allen and Chris Bosh.

              But interestingly, when those players played those heavy regular-season minutes, do you know how many of them won titles?

              In the last seven years: Zero.

              They all won their titles in seasons when they played fewer than 3,000 regular-season minutes.
              ~~~
              Even though I looked strictly at the three players with the heaviest minutes on title teams, we didn't find many players logging crazy minutes. Over the last 20 years, this group has averaged 2,706 minutes per 82-game season, or 33 minutes a game.
              ~~
              Here's a guess as to why coaches play their best players such long minutes: Because they're scared. Scared of lots of things. Scared of losing, scared of looking dumb and -- in an industry where the average job lasts just a few years -- scared of getting fired. The reality is that almost every coach in the NBA is on the hot seat every year.
              ~~


              http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/1297...2015-playoffs/http://espn.go.com/blog/truehoop/pos...orter-schedule

              The NBA is consulting with specialists to glean data about how denser elements of the NBA schedule impact performance and injury. The players union has hired a full-time sports scientist, Joe Rogowski, formerly of the Houston Rockets, and the league formed a 20-person injury prevention committee in early July headed by Dr. John DiFiori, the NBA director of sports medicine and a former president of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine.
              ~~

              Fatigue is a main factor in injuries, I don't think you can find anything to dispute that (obviously some injuries are fluke). Heavy minutes contribute to that fatigue and it was painfully obvious last year that we had a problem.

              slaw wrote: View Post
              There was another thread a while back where people (I can't remember who but I remember the thread) were suggesting that a 10% reduction in playing time would result in a 10% reduction in the risk of injury and trying to figure out how that played out over a game, a season - it doesn't work like that.
              To the bold, while I didn't participate in that thread, I took some of those comments as a bit tongue in cheek.
              Last edited by Axel; Thu Feb 25, 2016, 03:50 PM.
              Heir, Prince of Cambridge

              If you see KeonClark in the wasteland, please share your food and water with him.

              Comment


              • slaw wrote: View Post
                Yes, cause that's what I wrote..... come on, now.

                Obviously a coach has an impact on implementing and monitoring systems, etc. but these are largely big picture, strategic concepts worked out in the offseason and implemented during training camp and the early season. Tweaks might be made throughout the course of a season but they are largely minor because teams don't have the time to re-invent themselves in February. The idea that a team that was putrid defensively was going to be fixed with some adjustments during a playoff series in April is facile. I'm not absolving Casey of blame for the bad defense last year but that ship sailed long, long before the playoffs and tactical changes weren't going to fix it by that point.

                Larger perspective, it's often comforting and empowering to think that with a few adjustments here or there or some new bold thinking we can transform groups, teams, etc. but there are almost no examples of that working in the real world. It typically takes strategic planning, personnel changes and long lead times. In other words, the seeds of the fuck-ups from last year were planted in the offseason when certain personnel and strategic decisions were made. You don't fix problems like that with tactical brilliance....
                But many of the things Casey could have done was things that people were calling for all season long, so the "too late to make necessary changes" excuse falls flat right away.
                Heir, Prince of Cambridge

                If you see KeonClark in the wasteland, please share your food and water with him.

                Comment


                • Barolt wrote: View Post
                  You're totally right. In 1980, when Kareem Abdul-Jabbar went down in game 5 of the NBA finals, there was nothing Paul Westhead could do to turn the series around. Clearly, an injury to the team's best player meant that the 76ers were sure to win that series.

                  It would be insanity to suggest that it was a smart coaching adjustment to start a 6'8" rookie at center and have that be the key move to winning a championship.
                  Yes, Paul Westhead was a coaching genius. That's why the Lakers won Game 6 in 1980. That's the key lesson to draw from the 1980s and the career of Magic Johnson.

                  Comment


                  • slaw wrote: View Post
                    Yes, Paul Westhead was a coaching genius. That's why the Lakers won Game 6 in 1980. That's the key lesson to draw from the 1980s and the career of Magic Johnson.
                    Stupid Casey....Lowry was hurt so he should have started rookie year Magic Johnson!




                    Next reply: We all know Casey never plays rookies
                    Two beer away from being two beers away.

                    Comment


                    • slaw wrote: View Post
                      Yes, Paul Westhead was a coaching genius. That's why the Lakers won Game 6 in 1980. That's the key lesson to draw from the 1980s and the career of Magic Johnson.
                      The point was, adjustments made in season and in the playoffs can be very, very important.

                      You were implying that in-game and between-game adjustments don't make a big difference. Starting Magic at center in that game is the biggest example of them making a large difference.
                      twitter.com/anthonysmdoyle

                      Comment


                      • Barolt wrote: View Post
                        The point was, adjustments made in season and in the playoffs can be very, very important.

                        You were implying that in-game and between-game adjustments don't make a big difference. Starting Magic at center in that game is the biggest example of them making a large difference.
                        Sure but he was able to make this change because he had perhaps the most unique player of all time on his team?

                        I'm not convinced that Dwayne Casey couldn't have figured that out.

                        Theres arguments for Casey's failures to adjust (though the team was pretty limited last season by the playoffs imo) particularly with JJ but Casey can get better to and he has shown signs of adapting (See how his staggering of DeMar and Lowry has been near perfect)

                        I think the conensus by the so called NBA expert class is that Casey is a pretty solid coach who has improved.

                        Obviously, we have to wait and see abit with the rest of the season and the playoffs for a fuller analysis.

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