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Retool: BC, why must you be the "tool" part?

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  • #16
    Bouncepass wrote: View Post
    I disagree with those who say that the only way to achieve long-term success is to "tank" and build upon a few years in the lottery and high draft picks. This hasn't worked for many teams, and is still a "hit or miss" approach. Consider the Raptors as a prime example. They hit one of the top draft picks of the past decade with Chris Bosh (now one of the "Three Amigos"), and followed up with a #1 overall pick (Andrea Bargnani). Some can argue that they wasted the Bargnani pick, but he was a consensus top 2 or top 3 pick by all experts at the time. The problem was that Toronto had #1 in the wrong draft, which is very hard to predict anyway.

    I much prefer the Utah approach. Even while rebuilding, continue to enhance the value of the players on your roster by giving them a chance to win and succeed. This increases their value to other teams if you want to trade for a young asset, or for draft picks (like they did for #3 pick and Deron Williams). The problem with tanking is that you devalue all of your players as trade assets (consider Devin Harris with Dallas vs. NJ), and still might not get the franchise-saving altering player in the draft. So, I can't fault Colangelo for his logic. If having a somewhat competitive team builds the confidence, quality and value of some of his young core, then even if they don't develop into a top echelon group, they can still be moved for other promising players and/or high draft picks in the future.
    +1

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    • #17
      Bouncepass wrote: View Post

      Lark Benson:

      I agree with your overall sentiment that the Raptors should focus on building with their youth, but putting them in impossible situations where they can't play with decent players and compete can erode confidence, make it difficult to improve, and decrease their value if trades are needed to mold the team. Even if you are really bad, winning the lottery is literally a crapshoot (ask NJ), and then getting a franchise-changing player is not a certainty. Your point about Kobe is exactly what I mean (the Lakers traded for him, by the way). Having one or two top-tier players is not enough. You need to build a team around them, and "lucking" into them by draft (Bynum) or trade (Gasol) doesn't require tanking. Finally, I am pretty sure that most fans in most cities would enjoy the success of Utah.
      I completely agree that the lottery is a crapshoot, but I would argue that it's FAR LESS of a crapshoot than trying to assemble a group of young players with talent and veteran roleplayers, then either sign a FA alpha male type to lead them or to trade for one. Firstly, TO doesn't exactly have a great history of luring top name free agents, so you can more or less discount that idea. Secondly, trading for an all-star type player usually requires you to unload a lot of your talent and typically requires large expiring deals (which the Raps don't and won't have for years). Yes it looks like they will have the TPE so it's possible they could find a guy they're looking for, but even if you do manage to find one you're looking at likely 1-2 years to build that team, or said big-time free agent is probably gone, because teams only deal their big names when they're getting toward the end of their contracts and it doesn't look like they're going to resign. So you'll have an established group of players that you have to pray mesh with this new alpha dog that you've brought in, with very little time to tweak your roster and find the right pieces. And I think we've seen what happens when you can't find the right pieces to surround your star.

      The real advantage to finding your players in the draft is that you have 4 years to figure out what they can and can't do, and to bring players in that complement their strengths and weaknesses, thereby building a solid team rather than a collection of talent that doesn't mesh. And that's typically the difference between one or two seasons of success versus 4 or 5.

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