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NO FREE MARKET, This Is What The NBA *DAVID STERN* Should Do

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  • #16
    for you guys exact reasoning I feel the nba should up its draft age to 3 or 4 years of college. These kids would enter the nba ready to play and not be projects/players in development. Instantly would be ready to help out these small market franchises

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    • #17
      As an alternative idea to the enforced 3-4 years in college:
      1) Draft stays as is.
      2) Rookie salaries stay as they are.
      3) The 'free agent 4 years after' rule becomes 'free agent 4 years after a season when you play more than 20 games in the NBA, or 6 years after drafting, whichever comes first'.

      If a team figures a rookie isn't NBA-ready, they can develop them for up to two more years, and be certain that they'll still get four years of play from them post-development. These rookies can still be tested against real NBA competition - up to 20 games per season - as part of their development.

      The rookies can still get NBA scale salaries, a la Demar Derozen want to earn money to help my sick mother while she's still alive.

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      • #18
        ibzilla wrote: View Post
        In the NFL and MLB there is a compensation system or a franchise tag that restrict player movement and there aren't any complaints that the system should be changed. In the NFL the player is top 5 paid at his position and can always negotiate a long term contract if the uncertainty of a one year contract is too much. Yet in both sports no one player, including the quarterback, has more impact than a franchise player in basketball.
        In the NFL a team can win the Superbowl with an average quarterback (Ravens). The loss to one player isn't really a big deal because of the depth of a 53 man roster. Almost every year a great player goes down with an injury for the season only to be replaced by an even better backup. (ie Tom Brady)
        In the MLB one hitter can be pitched around and one pitcher pitches only once a week. The Blue Jays have a better record without Halladay.
        But no one can argue that a loss to Lebron James will devastate that franchise. I wouldn't be surprised if they won 20 games next season. Look at history, every single team had at least one superstar player carry that team (Bulls, Rockets,Lakers,Spurs,Miami,Boston) the only team that is the exception is Detroit and that is because they had a team with 5 all-stars rather than one or two superstars which is near impossible to recreate. In other sports a team can survive and even win without a superstar, but in the NBA its almost impossible.

        Also a lot of fans associate their loyalty to players rather than organizations. When Allen Iverson left Philly it seemed that he took half the fans with him as that arena looks half empty now. The casual fan may watch a game just to watch Kobe vs Lebron but won't watch Kobe vs the Cavs.
        There is nothing wrong with the league implementing rules so that it can thrive as a whole rather than to be top heavy like the MLB and the players can complain all they want but they are being well compensated for their troubles and can play in Europe if they don't like the rules as they have that option. No one is forcing them to play in the NBA. They placed their names eligible for the draft and hence must succumb to league rules. Thats not slavery. At the end of the day the NBA is a business and the players are employees and they must work together to make sure both sides are happy. If prospective players weren't able to play anywhere outside the NBA and were getting paid a very small percentage of revenue I would agree but these athletes chose the NBA and are getting more than 60% of revenue.

        Player movement helps teams in my opinion. Amare Stoudemire going to NY helps them. Boozer to the Bulls helps Chicago. But Lebron to Miami destroys Cleveland, Chris Paul leaving New Orleans kills them and Carmelo leaving Denver doesn't help either. Awarding a top pick to teams that lose these players isn't bad but sometimes it isn't enough. Its very rare for those type of athletes to come in the draft as you may get Bargnani one year and Dwight Howard the next. Small market teams are doomed to fail under this CBA as even when they manage to get the "once every 10 years" type player, the clock starts ticking right away. The team has 4 years to make a pitch to "convince" the talent to stay once his deal is up. I doubt Lebron would have stayed 3 years ago if he wasn't from Akron. If I'm Indiana, New Orleans, Charlotte, Toronto, Memphis, Minny ect ect I'm crossing my fingers every time my team drafts a star right away and my point is it shouldn't have to come down to that.
        You are talking about instituting slavery in the NBA, straight up. The player's make the league and bring the money in, not the owners. Anything that restricts the movement of players in the NBA is bad for the players and what is bad for the players is bad for the league and bad for the fans.

        The franchises mean nothing compared to the players.

        Lets not turn the clock back to an era that no one wants to go to.

        I would be for compensating the losing team via an extra draft pick like they do in baseball when they lose a very good player via free agency, but that is it. No restriction on player movement. A bad idea whose time has long since passed thank goodness.

        Just think about it for a moment. Under what I am proposing the Raptors would have had the second pick this last draft. Why

        1. It would be a compensation pick for a max player.
        2. Bosh played on the Raptors who had the worst record among teams that lost a max player. So the Raptors would have gotten the #2 pick in next June's draft along with their regular pick. In this case if the Raptors wind up with as bad a record as some here are forecasting then it will be a lottery pick. So under this system the Raptors could wind up with the first two picks; i.e. #1 and #2 in the June 2011 draft.

        I think by far the majority of Raptors fans would have been happy with that arrangement. In fact in the case of Bosh one could argue, because of his knee problems and annual injury problems that the Raptors might have actually come out ahead on this. I certainly would have.
        Last edited by Buddahfan; Sat Jul 31st, 2010, 09:54 AM.
        Avatar: Riverboat Coffee House 134 Yorkville Ave. billboard of upcoming entertainers - Circa 1960s

        Memories some so sweet, indeed

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        “As a captain, I played furiously. I drew a lot of fouls, but I brought everything I had to every practice and to every game. I left everything on the court because I simply wanted the team to win”
        Quote from well known personality who led their high school team to a state championship.

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        • #19
          ibzilla wrote: View Post
          Player movement helps teams in my opinion. Amare Stoudemire going to NY helps them. Boozer to the Bulls helps Chicago. But Lebron to Miami destroys Cleveland, Chris Paul leaving New Orleans kills them and Carmelo leaving Denver doesn't help either. Awarding a top pick to teams that lose these players isn't bad but sometimes it isn't enough. Its very rare for those type of athletes to come in the draft as you may get Bargnani one year and Dwight Howard the next. Small market teams are doomed to fail under this CBA as even when they manage to get the "once every 10 years" type player, the clock starts ticking right away. The team has 4 years to make a pitch to "convince" the talent to stay once his deal is up. I doubt Lebron would have stayed 3 years ago if he wasn't from Akron. If I'm Indiana, New Orleans, Charlotte, Toronto, Memphis, Minny ect ect I'm crossing my fingers every time my team drafts a star right away and my point is it shouldn't have to come down to that.
          You're only basing this off of what happened this summer, and just ignoring all the years before it. Let's just take a look at the teams you listed and the superstars they held for years: Indiana: Reggie Miller; Charlotte: Alonzo Mourning; Toronto: Vince Carter/Chris Bosh; Memphis: Pau Gasol; Minny: Kevin Garnett.

          All those teams had their drafted franchise players for a significant amount of time, the problem was they couldn't build around him, they couldn't get them a number 2 to take them to the next level and after years of losing the superstar wanted out, that's not the NBA's problem, that's the organizations problem. Most of the superstars in the league stay with their original team until they've been given a reason to leave.

          Quit making this out to be something it's not. A few big name players left this summer, mostly after being in crappy situations where there was no improvement, just a lot of player movement for the sake of player movement. And even then every analyst/expert agrees that this is an unprecedented move by The Three.

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