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Chris Bosh's Toronto Raptors Legacy

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  • Chris Bosh's Toronto Raptors Legacy

    Chris Bosh's Toronto Raptors Legacy

    By: Stephen Brotherston Last Updated: 8/17/10 11:56 AM ET

    For many fans in Toronto, the memory of Chris Bosh has quickly become that of yet another American All-Star basketball player who fled Canada for the comfort and familiarity of playing in his native United States. Bosh was just one more kid who couldn't handle how "different" living in Canada was for six months out of the year. Who knew the metric system was that scary?

    Maybe NBA Commissioner David Stern's dream of invading Europe and Asia is really still generations away from reality?

    But Bosh, like Vince Carter before him, spent seven years north of the US border and opted to sign a free agent deal with the Raptors before taking his talents south. At least Bosh honored the full measure of his contract instead of whining his way out of town mid-season. Maybe that is what should influence Raptors fans to boo or not to boo Bosh on his return next season.

    During their stay in Toronto, both Bosh and Carter wrote themselves into the Raptors record books for the long-term. Bosh's Raptors legacy includes taking the franchise's most shots and the most free throws, grabbing the most rebounds, scoring the most points, and having the most turnovers

    For many, a player's ultimate legacy is determined in the playoffs, and the playoffs are one area that Bosh leaves Toronto with little to remember him by.

    Forget the whining and excuses that the Raptors failed to surround Bosh with enough talent. This five-time All-Star only helped get Toronto to the post-season twice in his seven years there. Only once did Bosh lead the Raptors to more wins than losses in the regular season, and in the playoffs, they were handily dispatched in the first round each time.

    In Bosh's one real chance at playoff success, he averaged just 17.5 points and 9.0 rebounds against an inferior New Jersey Nets team in 2007. That was after having the best regular season to that point in his career where he averaged 22.6 points and 10.7 rebounds.

    Whether it is fair or unfair, Bosh's Toronto legacy includes an inability to lead his team to success.

    With all this, what will this popular player's legacy be in Toronto?

    After a period of reflection, the out-going Bosh will be remembered for his numerous personal accomplishments while in Toronto and little else. The ultimate feeling most fans will be left with will be one of disappointment. How could a five-time All-Star have accomplished so little, when it appeared that he had so much talent?
    comp article on link

    http://www.hoopsworld.com/Story.asp?story_id=17104
    Avatar: Riverboat Coffee House 134 Yorkville Ave. billboard of upcoming entertainers - Circa 1960s

    Memories some so sweet, indeed

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    Quote from well known personality who led their high school team to a state championship.

  • #2
    Chris Bosh's Legacy will always be the same as that of Pau Gasol's Legacy in Memphis. Really good player that had lots of great numbers. Became franchise leader in Points for that team. Led his team to the playoffs (one time vs bosh's two times), and never got out of the first round. Then left the franchise to go seek stardom, accolades and respect elsewhere. The only diffrence is that Bosh left on his own accord and left us with nothing whereas Pau got traded by an inept front office and got lucky in having his brother sent back and begin to flourish. I wonder how Memphis fans feel about Pau when they saw him win in LA.
    What if... Blazers had drafted both Drexler, Jordan?

    From 1992 Beginner's Guide to the NBA Finals, The Oregonian's special section. Published 6/3/1992.

    Michael Jordan was the #3 pick in the 1984 draft, after Portland selected Sam Bowie second.

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    • #3
      if the raptors lose, then bosh's legacy lives on.

      a legacy of being losers is still a legacy.

      i hope his legacy dies quickly.

      Comment


      • #4
        Down with bosh!!
        If Your Uncle Jack Helped You Off An Elephant, Would You Help Your Uncle Jack Off An Elephant?

        Sometimes, I like to buy a book on CD and listen to it, while reading music.

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        • #5
          Jordan-Drexler wrote: View Post
          Chris Bosh's Legacy will always be the same as that of Pau Gasol's Legacy in Memphis. Really good player that had lots of great numbers. Became franchise leader in Points for that team. Led his team to the playoffs (one time vs bosh's two times), and never got out of the first round. Then left the franchise to go seek stardom, accolades and respect elsewhere. The only diffrence is that Bosh left on his own accord and left us with nothing whereas Pau got traded by an inept front office and got lucky in having his brother sent back and begin to flourish. I wonder how Memphis fans feel about Pau when they saw him win in LA.
          Memphis did not get lucky in getting a good player in Marc Gasol. He was always around their training camp and practice facility whenever he could be and besides that he played his high school ball in America. Of course I am sure that Pau gave the Grizz management input on Marc's potential also.

          Early years

          While he spent almost all of his childhood in the Barcelona area, he moved as a teenager with his parents to the Memphis suburb of Germantown, Tennessee in 2001, after his older brother was drafted and signed by the Memphis Grizzlies, who finalized their move from Vancouver just after the draft. Gasol played high school basketball at Lausanne Collegiate School in Memphis.[1]He was named Division 2's Mr. Basketball in 2003 following a senior season in which he averaged 26 points, 13 rebounds and six blocks per game.[2] His parents still live in Germantown.[3]
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Gasol

          In addition as I recall Memphis was able to turn the available cap space from the Gasol trade into the acquisition of Zack Randolph. This was due to them also taking Kwame Brown and his big expiring contract in that trade.

          So Memphis did okay. Yes there might have been some luck in it, but one can say that about almost all trades that subsequently lead to the acquisition of better players. Were the Pistons lucky when they traded Darko to Memphis for what turned out to a 15th pick with which they were able to draft Stuckey?

          So in the long run the drafting by the Pistons of Darko at #2 has not turned out near as bad as most people say. Not that Stuckey is a #2 pick but he has certainly turned out to be a legit lottery pick if not top 10 lottery pick.
          Avatar: Riverboat Coffee House 134 Yorkville Ave. billboard of upcoming entertainers - Circa 1960s

          Memories some so sweet, indeed

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          Quote from well known personality who led their high school team to a state championship.

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          • #6
            Buddahfan wrote: View Post

            So in the long run the drafting by the Pistons of Darko at #2 has not turned out near as bad as most people say. Not that Stuckey is a #2 pick but he has certainly turned out to be a legit lottery pick if not top 10 lottery pick.
            But it could have been Melo, Dwade or Bosh.....

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            • #7
              Bosh's legacy is tied to the fate of the Raptors under his tenure here, given that he was unquestionably the team leader (minus the year when he played alongside Carter). He was an excellent player that, while putting up all-star numbers, was not able to take his team to the elite level.

              Players come and players go. Such is the nature of professional sports. Accordingly, Bosh's departure should not be reflected in whatever his legacy ultimately becomes. The idea that he left Toronto to play in the US is entirely a media fabrication. Anyone who was paying attention to media coverage of Bosh's 2-year long free agency should be well aware of this.


              The Raptors were a pretty good to average team with him as their Captain. No matter the different players that played beside him, the outcome was more or less the same. That is his legacy.

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              • #8
                Beaverboi wrote: View Post
                But it could have been Melo, Dwade or Bosh.....
                Check your thinking.

                I said that the draft pick did not turn out as horrible as most people think. Most people compare Darko to Melo, Wade and Bosh which made it horrible pick. However if you compare Stuckey to Melo, Bosh and Wade, despite what you may think it was not anywhere near as horrible a pick. Yes still a bad pick but not a horrible pick. Many many teams over the years have taken players a lot worse than Stuckey rather than having drafted a player good as Melo, Wade or Bosh.

                Stuckey as opposed to Wade is a bad pick but not horrible.

                There is a big difference between a bad pick and a horrible pick.

                Many bad picks are made in every draft but not near so many horrible picks.
                Avatar: Riverboat Coffee House 134 Yorkville Ave. billboard of upcoming entertainers - Circa 1960s

                Memories some so sweet, indeed

                Larger Photo of the avatar



                Quote from well known personality who led their high school team to a state championship.

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                • #9
                  • Years of missing the playoffs
                  • Years of getting humiliated in the playoffs
                  • Lots of individual accolades


                  That is Chris Bosh, on a basketball court, in Toronto. Was it his fault that the team could never reach high levels? No, I don't think so but I do think that it is on him, the guy who was the leader and wore it with pride, to lead the teams further than he did. He was not a good leader, plain and simple. He was a very talented player who would be the ultimate sidekick to a real winner. He must have came to that realization at some point because his new job title is "sidekick" or "coattail jockey". He is the second best player in Raptors history (Guys like T-Mac and Billups don't count because they didn't play during their periods of dominance in Toronto). However, I feel in June and July he threw the fans under the bus by all his words and antics. For that he has tarnished his name in Toronto. Had he left quietly and thanked the city all could be forgiven but the way he left? It was classless and insensitive.

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                  • #10
                    Buddahfan wrote: View Post
                    Check your thinking.

                    I know. That was just a scorned ex-girlfriend statement. For Years we appreciated what he brought and felt we were only one piece away.
                    "I feel in June and July he threw the fans under the bus by all his words and antics. For that he has tarnished his name in Toronto. Had he left quietly and thanked the city all could be forgiven but the way he left? It was classless and insensitive."

                    Agree 100%. Had he left, personally I would have understood. People leave jobs for other jobs all the time. No big deal, but you don't twat or farcebook or whatever he did about it.

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                    • #11
                      Bosh's legacy in Toronto will ultimately be the way he left. His tenure here was relatively uneventful, save for a few all star games and a couple of first round flameouts in the playoffs. He holds a lot of Raptors records but that's because it's a franchise with minimal history and a habit of losing their elite players after a few seasons.

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