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The Lockout & the Raptors: Players approve CBA, Owners too! (1944)

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  • The Lockout & the Raptors: Players approve CBA, Owners too! (1944)

    What are our baseline assumptions? Do we take the owners at their word that they're losing money and that the players are overpaid by about $700 million? For their part, they say they've provided certified accounting stattements and tax records to the players -- so there's at least some semblance of an open book. That doesn't make it impossible to hide things, but I'm more inclined to believe statemens that are backed up by data.

    So let's go with a premise that the next agreement needs to bring down player costs by about a third. The solution needs to do three things:

    1. Get them out of the mess they're in currently.
    2. Implement a system where they can't get right back into the same mess.
    3. Fix inequities created by differences in market size and owner financial resources.

    The answer to the third point is easy -- increased revenue sharing. For their part, the league has said that they're addressing revenue sharing separately but in parallel to the CBA discussions.

    The answer to #1 is principally salary rollbacks.

    Finally, the answer to #2 is primarily dealing with long-term guaranteed contracts. It's not guys like Kobe Bryant -- earning $25 million but also having an MVP-caliber season -- who are the problem. It's the guys like Eddy Curry, who are raking in eight figures for almost zero production. The Knicks would waive him in a hot second if they can escape paying his salary. And I'm not sure fans should be made to continue subsidizing him with their ticket & jersey purchases while he languishes on the bench.

    So here's a "tough love" proposal:

    *. A salary rollback. The owners will want 33%, the players 0%, but let's compromise at 20%. The rollback will be progessive, so that minimum-salary guys aren't touched at all, and the max salary guys take the greatest hit -- but the overall reduction is 20%.
    * The salary cap is based on net revenues rather than gross revenues. The inclusion/exclusions and the percentage split needs to be figured out, to ensure a correct revenue split.
    * Contracts can be guaranteed for two years, plus the "following" year (on January 10). A new contract is guaranteed for two years. The third year becomes guaranteed on Jan 10 of the second year. The fourth year becomes guaranteed on January 10 of the third year, etc.
    * All minimum-salary contracts are fully guaranteed. Protect the guys whose entire career might be just a couple seasons.
    * Max salaries stay where they are, but they become just that -- the maximum. No more exceeding the maximum via raises.
    * Teams retain Bird rights, but sign-and-trade goes away. It's like someone having a credit card that allows them to make purchses they can't afford, and having a heart attack when the credit card bill arrives.
    * Contracts are limited to five years. The mid-level exception is limited to three. The bi-annual goes away.
    * Non-simultaneous trades go away (and with them, trade exceptions).
    * A franchise tag is available, which can only be used on one player at a time, can't be used on the same player more than twice, and when applied, constitutes a one-year contract at the maximum salary.
    * A revenue sharing system is devised that equalizes teams based on market size and owner wealth, but rewards well-run and financially successful teams. This system takes the place of the luxury tax, which is eliminated.
    * Oh, and finally, sportswriters get 10%. We'll ask for 10% of the gross, but we'll settle for 10% of the net.
    Source: Hoops World

    Great insight. This guy really knows his stuff and I always love reading his opinion. In case you have not see my suggested sites on the RR Forums Questions, Suggestions or Feedback board then here:

    Larry Coon's NBA Salary Cap FAQ

    You'll be hard pressed to find a better explanation of the current CBA.
    31
    Yes
    77.42%
    24
    No - not a good deal, keep negotiating
    9.68%
    3
    No - not a good deal, decertify
    12.90%
    4

    The poll is expired.


  • #2
    More From Coon

    Will there be a lockout?
    With me it's not whether we'll have a lockout, it's how much of the season we'll lose.

    In 2005 they came to a quick agreement, but the two sides weren't very far apart. This year they want to make a fundamental change to the economics of the league. It'll be a huge pill for the players to swallow, and they won't do it without a tough fight. It'll be worse than 1998 -- and the 1998 lockout lasted until January 1999.

    When will the lockout end?
    I think it'll last until at least November 15, when the players miss their first paychecks. No reason for the owners to start serious horse trading until the players start to hurt from missing income.
    Source: Hoops World

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    • #3
      looks good especially the franchise tag, it will do more to keep teams competitive than anything else.

      Comment


      • #4
        best name ever.

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        • #5
          The Lockout & the Raptors

          After I saw the box score tonight I got this sick feeling that we won't see the Raptors play for a long time. Stupid owners, stupid players, just make a freaking deal. Man I hate unions. I have a feeling we're going to hear about some player discontent too once all of this is done. I wonder who the next Hedo will be.....

          Comment


          • #6
            I hear you friend but keep this in mind though: The NBA PA only has enough money to pay the players for less than a month. These guys live lavish lifestyles. Cut the money pipeline off and you'll see them blinking 100 times per minute. I think the worst case scenario is half a season of work stoppage. Especially if the NBA convinces FIBA to close the doors to their guys.

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            • #7
              No Raptors summer league team this year...

              In two more signs that the NBA is gearing up for a lockout starting July 1, the league has scrubbed its annual Las Vegas summer league and has also scuttled its annual summer internship program, according to league sources.

              The Las Vegas summer league normally starts around July 9, with upwards of 20 teams, including the Knicks, sending little-used veteran players and rookies to compete over a 10-day period.

              Also, the NBA usually hires about 30 college students to participate in a 10-week internship program in the league's offices in New York and at the league's entertainment division in Secaucus, N.J.

              In preparing for a lockout, the NBA is also not sending any teams abroad for training camp, and did not schedule any preseason games in Europe for this fall.

              Owners and players have not held formal negotiations since mid-February, but are expected to resume talks this month. The collective bargaining agreement expires June 30.-Mitch Lawrence
              Source: NY Daily News

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              • #8
                Book it

                Source: HoopsHype.com

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                • #9
                  Raptors players will get pay day overseas? No so fast...

                  Tim, it all comes down to what FIBA wants to do.
                  Source: ESPN.com

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                  • #10
                    What does this mean for the NDBL? There may have been some mentions of this somewhere, but I probably ignored it. As far as I know, the NDBL players are not in the same union, because they have very different rules governing them.
                    Read my blog, The Picket Fence. Guaranteed to make you think or your money back!
                    Follow me on Twitter.

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                    • #11
                      I don't understand why the player's union is fighting to take away the age minimum for drafting. All that does is take jobs away from veterans that know the game so teams can draft prospects.

                      It's so dumb. It's hard to make the players look like good guys in this one.

                      So sad. I'm not gonna start watching hockey.
                      Eh follow my TWITTER!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The players get 6 cheques a year starting on the 15th of November. Every missed cheque is a loss of 17% of their salary. Come December 15th and they have missed 1/3 a year salary, things will get done very quickly and it will probably be worse than they could have agreed to a year ago.

                        The players have 0 leverage in this dispute - none, zilch, nada. When owners are no longer losing money because operations are shut down, they can continue to wait it out until they get a deal that doesn't have over half the team losing money each season.

                        Unfortunately that rational and sound fact will not dawn on the players until December 15th at the earliest.

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                        • #13
                          Their view is that guys shouldn't be forced to do anything. Those old guys can do what most old guys do who don't want to give it up, move to China. Brandon Jennings should have never been forced to go overseas to be a pro when he wanted to be a pro.

                          If a guy is ready and willing he should be allowed to turn pro. Laws put in place which take rights away from people to "protect" them are never really put in place to protect them, they're put in place to serve other purposes. The age limit did nothing to help the NBA. The NBA is getting those kids no matter what. That rule was all about the NCAA losing out on marketable stars who were going to the NBA young.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Apollo wrote: View Post
                            Their view is that guys shouldn't be forced to do anything. Those old guys can do what most old guys do who don't want to give it up, move to China. Brandon Jennings should have never been forced to go overseas to be a pro when he wanted to be a pro.

                            If a guy is ready and willing he should be allowed to turn pro. Laws put in place which take rights away from people to "protect" them are never really put in place to protect them, they're put in place to serve other purposes. The age limit did nothing to help the NBA. The NBA is getting those kids no matter what. That rule was all about the NCAA losing out on marketable stars who were going to the NBA young.
                            WHile I understand their argument, I, for one, would love to see the age limit go up to 20. Nothing is stopping these guys from playing professionally, even in North America. There is no age limit in the NDBL. In fact, one guy who was drafted last year went straight from high school to the NDBL for a year and then into the draft.

                            The reason I'd like to see the age limit raised is because it simply means a better product on the court. Fans don't pay all that money to see players go through growing pains. I'd like to see even slightly more finished products enter the league. I like DeRozan, but I'd have loved to see him stay another year at USC and come into the league more polished. Too many guys come into the league and still are learning the game. Raising the age limit would simply make for a better game.
                            Read my blog, The Picket Fence. Guaranteed to make you think or your money back!
                            Follow me on Twitter.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Tim, one year of college and out is still leading to watching young guys struggle on the court. This is all about the NCAA and has nothing to do with the NBA. If the NBA was truely concerned about development and the players having a backup plan they would mandate that a player can't enter the draft until he graduates college or reaches the age of 23.

                              And most guys who go to the NDBL are never seen again.

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