Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What's Your Opinion of DeRozan's First 3 Games? (Chisholm: Debunking DD myth post 46)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • mcHAPPY
    replied
    Chisholm: Debunking the idea of DeRozan struggling

    There has been a lot of humming and hawing over the first week of the NBA season over DeMar DeRozan's supposedly ineffectual game. His production in the first three quarters of games against Cleveland and Indiana stood out, as did his meager 11-point outing in a loss to Dallas. DeRozan finally had a game breakout against the turnstile defense offered by New York on Monday, but overall fans are turning up their nose at his production early in the season.

    Looking at his numbers from last year, though, DeRozan is averaging the same 17.2 ppg, the same 3.8 rpg, the same 1.0 spg and is shooting an improved .470 from the floor and a wildly improved .626 from three-point range. So why, then, are so many so frustrated with his production early this season?
    The good news is that DeRozan, through five "disappointing" games is holding his production up to last season's output, while significantly improving upon one of his greatest weaknesses (three-point shooting). He hasn't taken a step back; he just hasn't leapt forward yet, either. He's not a guy you can effectively evaluate yet in small sample sizes (the same goes for the struggling Ed Davis, by the way), he's a guy you take a look at at season's end and track the overall progress of his game from Year 2 to Year 3. Remember, this is a developmental year for the club, a chance for Casey to push his young troops to improve with teaching, playing time and discipline. Individual improvements will be gradual and need to be taken in over a long period of time. Don't fret week-long or even month-long slumps. Save your worry for the end of the year when a guy has shown no improvement from game one to game sixty-six. Or, more optimistically, wait until the end of the season to see how far the players have come from where they started out in late December.

    Source: Tim Chisholm, TSN.ca


    1st two and last paragraph. The middle part must have had a word count minimum for the editors at TSN.

    Leave a comment:


  • NoPropsneeded
    replied
    Demar Derozan Dunk mix



    Pretty cool mix. I was bored on youtube and came across this video. Thought I'd share it with you guys

    Leave a comment:


  • NoPropsneeded
    replied
    Demar in imo will end up a better scorer then Iguodala. Might even crack a couple of all star games

    Leave a comment:


  • mcHAPPY
    replied
    Mediumcore wrote: View Post
    I'm in agreement that Gay and Miller can create for themselves and have the ability to create for others, but I'd rather go with Miller over Gay. Rudy is a bit of a black hole when he receives the ball and I don't think he fits well into the "move the ball on offense" concept which Casey is trying to instill with the team.

    I realize that DD would be giving up size at the SF position, but he's a growing boy and if Iggy can man the spot then I don't see why DD can't use his superior athletecism against slower SF's as well. Not sold on that idea by any means, but I was just trying to think of ways to possibly keep DD in a Rap's uniform.
    Good point on AI. Both AI and DD are around the same size and athletic. Now if only DD could defend like AI I think the idea would be worth ample consideration.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mediumcore
    replied
    Matt52 wrote: View Post
    Rudy Gay and Quincy Miller are, in my opinion, the type of player you referred to as being able to create their own shot of which you felt teams needed at least 2 of.

    I would not want DeMar playing at the SF unless it was a favourable matchup. Looking around the league most SF's are 6'7/6'8 and 225-240 - there are exceptions but that appears to be the norm.
    I'm in agreement that Gay and Miller can create for themselves and have the ability to create for others, but I'd rather go with Miller over Gay. Rudy is a bit of a black hole when he receives the ball and I don't think he fits well into the "move the ball on offense" concept which Casey is trying to instill with the team.

    I realize that DD would be giving up size at the SF position, but he's a growing boy and if Iggy can man the spot then I don't see why DD can't use his superior athletecism against slower SF's as well. Not sold on that idea by any means, but I was just trying to think of ways to possibly keep DD in a Rap's uniform.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nilanka
    replied
    Matt52 wrote: View Post
    Rudy Gay and Quincy Miller are, in my opinion, the type of player you referred to as being able to create their own shot of which you felt teams needed at least 2 of.

    I would not want DeMar playing at the SF unless it was a favourable matchup. Looking around the league most SF's are 6'7/6'8 and 225-240 - there are exceptions but that appears to be the norm.
    Agreed, I don't think DeMar at SF is a good idea from a defensive perspective. I find that DeMar has enough trouble as it is checking guys his own size. Things will only get worse when you match him up against bigger, stronger players, who also have legitimate post-up games.

    Leave a comment:


  • mcHAPPY
    replied
    Mediumcore wrote: View Post
    Would like to see Demar given a shot at SF first since we've invested a few years in him already. He is a top 10 pick after all and you can't give up on those too quickly. He'd be giving up a fair bit of size against the likes of Melo, Lebron and Pierce, but so do the rest of SF's in the league.

    Rudy Gay is a talent, but would he be a good addition to Casey's team first concept? I haven't seen much of Q. Miller, but he seems to have great range in his jump shot and better handles than Demar already. I'd gravitate to the idea of of turning DD into a draft pick versus Gay.
    Rudy Gay and Quincy Miller are, in my opinion, the type of player you referred to as being able to create their own shot of which you felt teams needed at least 2 of.

    I would not want DeMar playing at the SF unless it was a favourable matchup. Looking around the league most SF's are 6'7/6'8 and 225-240 - there are exceptions but that appears to be the norm.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mediumcore
    replied
    Matt52 wrote: View Post
    What about SF? How about a player like Rudy Gay or Quincy Miller?
    Would like to see Demar given a shot at SF first since we've invested a few years in him already. He is a top 10 pick after all and you can't give up on those too quickly. He'd be giving up a fair bit of size against the likes of Melo, Lebron and Pierce, but so do the rest of SF's in the league.

    Rudy Gay is a talent, but would he be a good addition to Casey's team first concept? I haven't seen much of Q. Miller, but he seems to have great range in his jump shot and better handles than Demar already. I'd gravitate to the idea of of turning DD into a draft pick versus Gay.

    Leave a comment:


  • e2thed
    replied
    DeMar DeRozan Becoming a Focal Point

    Starting his third season with the Raptors after being drafted ninth overall in 2009, 22-year-old shooting guard DeMar DeRozan is being asked to grow up fast and become one of the focal points in Toronto.

    “The team will definitely go off how Andrea and I are playing,” DeRozan told HOOPSWORLD. “We have to take that responsibility and take on that challenge every night.”

    Last year DeRozan started in all 82 games and doubled his rookie scoring average with 17.2 points per game, finishing second behind Andrea Bargnani. This year, the team’s one-two offensive punch continues to be Bargnani and DeRozan, but a lot more is being expected from both of them than just scoring.

    “Look at it like a challenge,” continued DeRozan. “You’ve got to be up for the challenge and be willing to take whatever consequences that comes with it and be accountable for everything you do. I think that’s part of being a pro and at the same time just understanding your role, and once you understand, I think it becomes much easier.

    “I’m getting more and more comfortable after every game, after every practice.”

    In his first two seasons, DeRozan struggled on defense and couldn’t find his three-point shot. These deficiencies offset some of the benefits of his rapidly developing mid-range and slashing game, but things appear to be quickly changing this year. New Head coach Dwane Casey established an early emphasis on discipline and defense, and the team acquired some savvy veterans to help the process.

    “I think that’s beneficial for us, especially with young players, to have a coach like that,” said DeRozan. “It’s definitely been paying off. I think everybody’s buying into everything he’s pushing, on the defensive end especially.

    “We’ve got a lot of new guys, a lot more veteran experience, a couple of older guys that have definitely helped us younger guys progress a little bit faster, especially with a new defense, new offense and a new coaching staff.

    “If we have to learn something in two weeks, we’re going to have to learn it because we understood with the lockout we might not play a whole season, so whatever happens we have to be prepared for it, I think everybody was.”

    Already DeRozan has shown confidence in his formerly missing three-point shot, and after just five games, he has been hitting from range at a 62.5 percent clip and has as many threes as in all of last season. Steals, rebounds, and assists continue to run at last year’s pace and DeRozan looks more comfortable on the defensive end of the floor.

    “Understand that every night may not be your night, but I can still contribute on the defensive end. There’s always a way you can contribute.”

    Part of becoming a focal point is developing a belief in your own success and that of your team, and DeRozan knows what success is for himself and the Raptors.

    “I just want to be successful, to become a better player, a better pro, a better person overall and at the same time help my team win and represent this organization the best that I can.

    “Our team can definitely be good. I think we’ve got a great chance. We’re all still gelling together and learning a lot of new things and I think it’s nothing but up for us, and that’s where we’re going because we’re definitely working hard every day, even in practice or if it’s a shoot around to become a better team. I think we’re going to be alright.”

    For DeRozan, this optimism has a source and it has been a common theme since the end of last season. Coach Casey has everyone from the locker room to the front office believing things are about to get a lot better for the Raptors.

    “Because he definitely wouldn’t tell us anything wrong,” exclaimed DeRozan. “He knows what it takes to win. He won a championship, played with a great veteran team and is sharing all that experience with us. It can’t do anything but pay off.”

    DeRozan still has a lot of room to develop, but the Raptors investment in starting him 147 times over the past two seasons and his own strong personal work ethic have prepared him for the role of becoming a focal point under Coach Casey’s guidance. By the time this season is over, DeRozan will have taken another huge step towards fulfilling the role envisioned for him when he was drafted by the Raptors.
    Source : Hoopsworld

    Leave a comment:


  • mcHAPPY
    replied
    Mediumcore wrote: View Post
    His shot has improved and he clearly exhibits that confidence. I can't beleive that a guy whom works as hard as he does can't improve in any part of his game which is currently lacking (defense, handles, etc...) because he has the physical gifts to do so. Where he is lacking the most is the creativity to do something with the ball to create for himself or others which is essential for a SG. You see what happens when teams double Jose to get the ball out of his hands. The offense goes stagnant. This is when a SG needs to be able to step in and do more for his team than bring the ball up the court.

    As much as I like him I think the Rap's need to look at either moving him to small forward or possibly trade him. A starting line up has to have atleast 2 players whom can handle the rock and create for themself as well as others, and the two obvioius spots to get that from are PG & SG.
    What about SF? How about a player like Rudy Gay or Quincy Miller?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mediumcore
    replied
    His shot has improved and he clearly exhibits that confidence. I can't beleive that a guy whom works as hard as he does can't improve in any part of his game which is currently lacking (defense, handles, etc...) because he has the physical gifts to do so. Where he is lacking the most is the creativity to do something with the ball to create for himself or others which is essential for a SG. You see what happens when teams double Jose to get the ball out of his hands. The offense goes stagnant. This is when a SG needs to be able to step in and do more for his team than bring the ball up the court.

    As much as I like him I think the Rap's need to look at either moving him to small forward or possibly trade him. A starting line up has to have atleast 2 players whom can handle the rock and create for themself as well as others, and the two obvioius spots to get that from are PG & SG.

    Leave a comment:


  • mcHAPPY
    replied
    Raptorsss wrote: View Post
    I made this post on an ESPN board and it's important to keep perspective on the kid. At 19 all he could do was slash and dunk. He worked his ass off in the off-season and developed a solid mid-range game and FT shooting. At 21 he worked his ass off and developed his 3 point shooting. So, there is a solid trend of the kid working hard and improving his game.

    However, his b-ball IQ is still pretty low and he's still very much a student of the game. He's still fairly lost on the defensive end and hasn't found his place in the offense, yet.

    I expect him to have his best year statistically for rebounds, assists and steals this year, but he's still 2-3 years away before he can be considered an elite SG. His work ethic is certainly pushing him in the right direction.

    Edit: The dude is only 21 its way too soon to talk about his ceiling, there hasn't really been any regression or plateau'ing of his game, since he came into the league.

    Bargs, is only now turning into the player we hoped for when we drafted him and he's 26.
    He is 22 but everything else is very true.

    Leave a comment:


  • NoPropsneeded
    replied
    Raptor_11 wrote: View Post
    I can't see demar having much better numbers than 18, 4 and 5
    lol he averaged 17, 4 and 2 last season. He can easily average better numbers than those guaranteed, he puts up 20 points effortlessly he'll only improve over the course of this season.

    Leave a comment:


  • Raptorsss
    replied
    I made this post on an ESPN board and it's important to keep perspective on the kid. At 19 all he could do was slash and dunk. He worked his ass off in the off-season and developed a solid mid-range game and FT shooting. At 21 he worked his ass off and developed his 3 point shooting. So, there is a solid trend of the kid working hard and improving his game.

    However, his b-ball IQ is still pretty low and he's still very much a student of the game. He's still fairly lost on the defensive end and hasn't found his place in the offense, yet.

    I expect him to have his best year statistically for rebounds, assists and steals this year, but he's still 2-3 years away before he can be considered an elite SG. His work ethic is certainly pushing him in the right direction.

    Edit: The dude is only 21 its way too soon to talk about his ceiling, there hasn't really been any regression or plateau'ing of his game, since he came into the league.

    Bargs, is only now turning into the player we hoped for when we drafted him and he's 26.
    Last edited by Raptorsss; Tue Jan 3rd, 2012, 05:07 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fully
    replied
    slaw wrote: View Post
    Well, look, the stats are all skewed because the sample size is too small. But that's kinda my point. It's premature to judge anyone based on 5 games. It's especially ridiculous when a team has a brand new coaching staff, a completely different system, and a player is in his third year with little around him. People who are eyeballing a guy and making these kinds of proclamations 5 games in have no idea what they are talking about. Now, he might flop this year or show no improvement over 66 games, but that makes these people lucky, not wise.

    Derozan was a completely different player Year 1 to Year 2. I have no idea if we'll see the sort of second half surge from last year but he does have a history of that sort of development going back to his USC days. I think part of the issue is that there are people in Raptorland who believed or hoped he is the next Kobe Bryant. So, they see anything less as an abject failure. IF Derozan can continue to be efficient offensively while improving his AST% and his defense, there is no reason he can't be a solid starter on a good team who, once in a while, can score 15 in a quarter. He isn't going to be a superstar. There's nothing wroing with that.
    I was going to make a very similar post.

    DeRozan is by all accounts a hard working guy who has shown considerable improvements throughout his first two seasons in the NBA, so assuming that he's suddenly plateaued after five games of his third season is a pretty big stretch especially when you factor all the variables (new coach, new system, etc.) in as well.

    His ceiling is more Caron Butler than Kobe Bryant, but that doesn't mean we need to give up on him or explore trading him, and certainly not now while he's still very much in the development phase. What would we expect to get back for him exactly? We aren't getting a top five pick in the 2012 draft for him unless there's a team out there that is convinced he's going to be a superstar (unlikely) and trading him for a veteran player doesn't fit with the rebuild philosophy.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X