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great power forwards are a dime a dozen these days...

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  • great power forwards are a dime a dozen these days...

    Last draft # 2 over all... heck I am noticing there is a huge glut of 'great' power forwards..

    UTAH
    Paul Millsap, Derrick Favors, Al Jefferson
    Toronto: Ed Davis, Bargs, Amir and now Kleiza

    Reggie evans is one of the most popular raptors ever and one of the best rebounders/paint defenders in the league and he went for a song.

    forthcoming draft is chalked full of PF's - go around the league and it seems every teams has a glut of PF's or undersized Centers (PF's in disguise).

    That is why Raps can't move *avis for anything of Value.
    "I may be wrong ... but I doubt it"

  • #2
    Unfortunately true. This is why if I ever have a kid, they will be drilled into a pass first point guard. Seems like a lost position.

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    • #3
      exactly what i was thinking...

      why are we loading up with mediocre potential when there's no team that would even want what we have as trade bait? Almost every team seems to be set at that position ... with extras left.

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      • #4
        The other consideration is depth. Look at the measures Memphis went to when Z-Bo went down with injury. I agree there are a lot of talented PF's these days throughout the league but top teams have more than a starter(s) at each position, including PF.

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        • #5
          charlz wrote: View Post

          Reggie evans is one of the most popular raptors ever and one of the best rebounders/paint defenders in the league and he went for a song.
          Not to be nitpicky but I'm not sure about this statement. He rebounds well but his defence is porous at best. The Raps last year were one of the worst interior defences last year and he's partly responsible for that. As for the glut of 4s, ask OKC or Portland if they have any decent bigs (off of the bench that is). I'm not sure at this point if they will even try to move Davis. The front office is high on him. Also, given the injury bugs to both Amir and Bargs, he still has a role to play in this team.
          “The saving of our world from pending doom will come, not through the complacent adjustment of the conforming majority, but through the creative maladjustment of a nonconforming minority.” - Martin Luther King

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          • #6
            Balls of Steel wrote: View Post
            Not to be nitpicky but I'm not sure about this statement. He rebounds well but his defence is porous at best. The Raps last year were one of the worst interior defences last year and he's partly responsible for that.
            +1. I was going to say exactly that. Reggie Evans has never been known as a "paint defender". He's a good rebounder, and that's it. He does nothing else even remotely well.

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            • #7
              Reggie Evans aside, I would agree with that sentiment charlz. 6'9" - 6'10" lean "athletic" PF are all over the place. We have an extra but there is just no demand in trades for players like Amir and ED.

              Conversely, this same surplus is part of what makes Bargniani so unique and valuable. He is an atypical PF and is a mismatch for almost anyone he comes up against. His movement + size + shooting is not something your typical PF can defend.

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              • #8
                I'd say the Spurs, *eltics and Magic could have all used an Amir type player during the last couple of playoff runs. As Matt52 mentioned depth is something all good teams need and with JV in the fold next season we are set to deal with injuries at the PF and C spots should/when it happens.

                Shoring up those spots now leaves them open to going after wings and a solid pg through the draft and free agency.

                Looking forward to see what the 2012/2013 roster is going to look like.

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                • #9
                  SandmanFan wrote: View Post

                  Conversely, this same surplus is part of what makes Bargniani so unique and valuable. He is an atypical PF and is a mismatch for almost anyone he comes up against. His movement + size + shooting is not something your typical PF can defend.
                  +1

                  cant believe I am in the Bargs camp now... Well done with the hard work Bargs I am beyond pleasantly surprised.
                  "I may be wrong ... but I doubt it"

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                  • #10
                    While I do agree that there seem to be a lot more 'good' PF than in the past, especially as the average height of players continues to increase, I think it's an evolving position. What I mean by that, is that not all PF are the same type of player; not only is depth required, but there's becoming a sort of PF specialization - similar to what happened to pitchers in baseball in the 70s (now there are starters, long relievers, short relievers, matchup lefties, setup men, closers, etc...).

                    Types of PF
                    1) Banger - traditional big, too small to play C on a regular basis, slow footed, focus on rebounding/defense (ie: Perkins, Haslem)
                    2) Post-up Scorer - more athletic, better movement, primarily post-up and inside offensive game (ie: Aldridge, Griffin)
                    3) Shooters - essentially SF players in PF body (ie: Bargnani, Bosh)
                    4) Floor Spreaders - similar to shooters, these are PF designed to spread the floor and pull opposing bigs out from under the basket, to open lanes for penetration, while being able to consistently knock down 3pt shots (ie: Jamison, Anderson)

                    I think more and more you see teams not only trying to have depth at the PF position, but also diversity of the type of PF they have, to allow them more flexibility to exploit various matchups. Also, by having various types of 'good' PF on the bench, a team can go with a smaller lineup that has 2 PF, without creating redundancy on the court.

                    These days a lot of PF are much more athletic and skilled than in the past and use it as a way to differentiate themselves from other PF. IMO a lot of what makes a PF 'good' is the type of PF he is, the skillset he brings to the table and how he fits in with the team around him. A GM needs to find a good mix of players overall and PF is becoming one of the positions that has the most diversity; similar to how a 'good' wing player is either a driving scorer, a sharpshooter or a lock-down perimiter defender - how many times have we seen a player be 'good' on one team, then look far less impactful when he signs for big money elsewhere, because his skillset didn't mesh as well on the new roster?

                    If the Raps are looking to deal a PF (likely Amir/Davis) to get a draft pick or fill a hole at another position, they not only need to look at teams that are likely looking to address PF depth, but at teams that don't have that type of PF. I would say that Davis falls into category #1, but could develop his game to become a #2. Amir is more of a #2 in my mind.


                    On a side note relating to this topic, I see that Bogut has a fractured ankle... I wonder how quickly BC might be on the phone offering up Amir/Davis to fill the void as Milwaukee fights for a playoff spot?!
                    Last edited by CalgaryRapsFan; Fri Jan 27th, 2012, 12:02 PM.

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