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  • draftedraptor
    replied
    stretch wrote: View Post
    Sullinger has been shopping himself around as the next Kevin Love, recalling that Love drew a lot of skepticism coming out of UCLA that he wasn't big enough, not athletic enough for the NBA.
    Why not?
    he is solid and could very well be another kevin love.

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  • stretch
    replied
    Sullinger has been shopping himself around as the next Kevin Love, recalling that Love drew a lot of skepticism coming out of UCLA that he wasn't big enough, not athletic enough for the NBA.

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  • The Coach
    replied
    Puffer wrote: View Post
    "This week, when national team staff attempted to quantify Andrew Wiggins’s vertical leap, Wiggins jumped higher than the measuring apparatus could measure. Officials had to elevate the device to properly assess the bounds of Wiggins’ explosiveness. The gist: His 44-inch vertical leap and 6-foot-11 wingspan mean he can touch 12-foot-6, six inches below the top of an NBA backboard.

    Pure athleticism isn’t the only reason for the fuss. His jump shot is a smooth re-enactment of the textbook freeze-frame. His knack for timing rebounds and blocked shots speaks to his on-court maturity.

    “He’s already NBA size for his position. He already has NBA athleticism,” said Rowan Barrett, Canada Basketball’s executive vice president. “When you put those two things together and you add the refining of the skills . . . He’s 17 this year. Imagine what he’s going to be when he’s 20. Absolutely scary. I don’t see him as a kid who’s going to get caught up in the hoopla. If he stays on the same track he’s on, the sky’s the limit for him.”
    http://www.thestar.com/sports/basket...t-track-to-nba
    Wow. Very impressive... thanks for the find Puffer.

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  • Puffer
    replied
    "This week, when national team staff attempted to quantify Andrew Wiggins’s vertical leap, Wiggins jumped higher than the measuring apparatus could measure. Officials had to elevate the device to properly assess the bounds of Wiggins’ explosiveness. The gist: His 44-inch vertical leap and 6-foot-11 wingspan mean he can touch 12-foot-6, six inches below the top of an NBA backboard.

    Pure athleticism isn’t the only reason for the fuss. His jump shot is a smooth re-enactment of the textbook freeze-frame. His knack for timing rebounds and blocked shots speaks to his on-court maturity.

    “He’s already NBA size for his position. He already has NBA athleticism,” said Rowan Barrett, Canada Basketball’s executive vice president. “When you put those two things together and you add the refining of the skills . . . He’s 17 this year. Imagine what he’s going to be when he’s 20. Absolutely scary. I don’t see him as a kid who’s going to get caught up in the hoopla. If he stays on the same track he’s on, the sky’s the limit for him.”
    http://www.thestar.com/sports/basket...t-track-to-nba

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  • mcHAPPY
    replied
    Nilanka wrote: View Post
    Except for Sullinger, lol.
    Laugh of the day right there!

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  • Nilanka
    replied
    Tesla wrote: View Post
    Every player has upside
    Except for Sullinger, lol.

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  • Sig
    replied
    ceez wrote: View Post
    i wouldn't be upset with either. both have upside.
    Every player has upside

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  • ceez
    replied
    i wouldn't be upset with either. both have upside.

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  • The Coach
    replied
    So nobody is going to push for us to draft Kris Joseph at 37 and Robert Sacre at 56?

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  • Nilanka
    replied
    Leo Rautins.

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  • Soft Euro
    replied
    LBF wrote: View Post
    Is it true that netherlands still are especially kind to canadians because of that thing with the princess and ww2?
    It's the only reason we haven't invaded Canada yet.

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  • The Coach
    replied
    Bendit wrote: View Post
    I believe I mentioned "NBA players" in my first note and have a different opinion about the pro NHL hockey player even on the matter of the "home town discount" which I believe is fairly common in the NHL. The hockey culture is just more team oriented and ownership in the past have taken much advantage of this. I had previously mentioned the possibility of a "cultural" difference in the NBA. Of course there will always be exceptions. I just remember being very disappointed that JM always said "no". His participating could have advanced the game so much more even in Toronto. Even today, Nash has gotten involved again to do this. In anycase, I digress from the central notion in discussion...with regard to the Raptors...no national or hometown perogatives, childhood friendships or other nepotistic reasoning should supersede talent and need. This leads to clique forming. Just not good.
    You make an interesting point about the difference between athletes in different sports... never thought that that would be a huge factor. I still contend that their are athletes in basketball that enjoy playing in/close to their home towns/states. I would say money and branding themselves seems like priority; however, you don't think there is any motivation in playing for home town? I have heard that DeMar would be interested in going back to the LA area to be close to family. Both Tristan and Cory mentioned how great it would be to play for the Raptors in their pre-draft workouts (yes, most guys says that, but you know they actually would of).

    I also agree that we do not want to create a fraternity or clique, but a winning culture... I do think that to create a winning culture you must have guys that want to be here and have a strong passion to see the Raps succeed. I believe players like Nash would wear the jersey with pride, and he is not the only Canadian basketball player that would be that way.

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  • LBF
    replied
    Soft Euro wrote: View Post
    ...
    The Netherlands is culturally much closer to Canada...
    you).
    Is it true that netherlands still are especially kind to canadians because of that thing with the princess and ww2?

    Leave a comment:


  • LBF
    replied
    Father rev wrote: View Post
    They messed up BIG TIME when they drafted PJ TUCKER over Denham Brown...
    I think we can agree denham is a better player than pj.

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  • Soft Euro
    replied
    Bendit wrote: View Post
    If I understand the typical euro national sensibility, it is an honour to represent their country at the world's or Olympic tournaments. Sometimes this participation is forced (not overt) but there is much national fervour and pressure that not participating is not an option for fear of being "loathed" locally. Nationalism is a much more prevalent entity than in North America. After all it is the "fear" of this that in part prompted the creation of the Euro project! Even in the US it is a different type of fervour. Rather than nationalism as the driver it is more a proving of American exceptionalism. Canada does not have this trait (I dont believe).
    In Europe there is a lot of diversity between countries; for instance, The Netherlands is culturally much closer to Canada than to Lithuania and other Eastern European countries. It's hard to speak about a 'typical euro national sensibility'. But I understand what you mean when looking at some of the original countries that were part of the European Union (France and Germany I'm looking at you).

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