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  • Bendit
    replied
    Four years ago, Christopher Parker, an African American political scientist at the University of Washington, made the provocative argument that Donald Trump’s candidacy could “do more to advance racial understanding than the election of Barack Obama.”

    “Trump’s clear bigotry,” Parker wrote in the American Prospect, a liberal journal, “makes it impossible for whites to deny the existence of racism in America. . . . His success clashes with many white Americans’ vision of the United States as a fair and just place.”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...s-is-building/

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  • Joey
    replied
    S.R. wrote: View Post
    Until Alberta diversifies its economy and its tax revenues, it's going to keep suffering massive job losses every time OPEC, Russia, and the US start bickering like toddlers at the dinner table.
    Thank you. It really isn't hard to understand. Welcome to being the only Province without a Provincial Sales Tax.

    Call of Duty Modern Warfare Q&A - Warzone

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  • S.R.
    replied
    Until Alberta diversifies its economy and its tax revenues, it's going to keep suffering massive job losses every time OPEC, Russia, and the US start bickering like toddlers at the dinner table.

    The US made a big shift towards better energy independence in just a few years because they had the political will to do it. Too many in power in Alberta (or those with the ears of power) are happy with the status quo. (And Canada's still too content being a commodities colony too much of the time. too.)

    Meanwhile, facing a severe drop in revenues in AB due to COVID and a cratered oil economy, Jason Kenney's panel of experts featuring Stephen Harper predictably came up with the brilliant idea of dropping revenues further through corporate tax cuts. This will definitely decrease revenues by hundreds of millions but the promise from Edmonton is a $300 million corporate tax cut will generate $13 billion of economic growth. Hot damn that was easy, other provinces should try it. Probably don't have the right experts.

    Outside of right wingers with a lifetime commitment to trickle down economics, the general consensus is trickle down economics is a complete myth. But the political commitment is there on the right and refuses to change no matter how many studies show otherwise. That's the type of head-in-the-sand politics we all end up paying for, no matter which side of the spectrum it comes from. Ideologies are too entrenched.

    In not unrelated news, over the past 4 months while 45 million Americans have applied for EI supports, America's billionaires have increased their wealth by over $400 billion. The biggest businesses in the country (undisclosed recipients) have taken half a trillion dollars of public bail out/benefits money while individual Americans got $1,200 each - not even a month's housing costs for most. We're quite sure all this is going to translate into a massive economic boom in short order though, so no worries there.

    This kind of stuff is just super short sighted, it's not good for any of us. And back to OP point - 'expert' economic consensus does not argue for these politics. This is purely political, commitment to an ideology, it's the result of lobbying from powerful/wealthy sources, campaign donations, and the fact that most politicians are very wealthy people who are often well connected to big business. In the US especially the government is literally populated by millionaires.

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  • slaw
    replied
    City of Calgary got a bunch of experts together to come up with a plan to save the city from economic ruin. Here are there ideas:

    1. increase parking fees.
    2. Increase electricity prices.
    3. Taxi and Uber taxes
    4. golf course tax
    5. tourism tax
    6. working from home tax
    7. online sales tax
    8. sales tax
    9. income tax
    10. gas tax
    11. alcohol tax
    12. cigarette tax
    13. insurance tax!
    14. toll roads
    15. hotel tax
    16. restaurant tax

    During a 6 years recession that has gutted the city and its citizens on the end of global pandemic, the experts have spoken. We must listen. Though, I was surprised there is not an oxygen tax. Perhaps next year.

    Leave a comment:


  • S.R.
    replied
    Re: statues - seen a lot of "but it's history!" opposition which seems to eagerly gloss over what exactly a statue is and why it's erected. A statue, and may of these in places like right in front of a state legislature, city hall, etc., isn't just a record of history. It's an attempt to honour notable people. Has anyone ever proposed putting a statue of Jeffrey Dahmer in a city park so we remember public safety? Does France have statues of Hitler in Paris so they don't forget WWII? Can you show me which American Native Reserve has a statue of Columbus so they don't forget colonization? Can you even imagine those conversations happening? Statues =/= history, statues = honour. That's the problem.

    Plenty of ways to remember the Confederacy and the civil war. Can be land markers and monuments, e.g. at battlefields, obviously museum content, books, public education curriculum, etc. etc. But a statue of a Confederate general in front of your legislative building is not really about keeping the historical record, it's about honour. The timeline of when those statues were erected in the south very much backs that up, many were erected as not so subtle opposition to civil rights movements. They're highly political and the people living there know that full well. Putting them up was a political statement and taking them down is a political statement.

    Leave a comment:


  • S.R.
    replied
    slaw wrote: View Post

    Dude, the Democrats think there are more than two sexes and that fetuses aren’t people. You cannot lecture anyone about being anti science or expertise.
    That there is the hyper partisanship that's ruining American politics. Here's an option: there are more than two options. What a telling thing to revert immediately to "but the Dems!"

    The GOP has slowly devolved into what they are today, mostly when they started courting the Moral Majority. They're really bottoming out now, they'll openly mock former generals, scientists, economists, education - anyone who disagrees with their political ideology. I mean that always happens in politics but there are degrees, and it's become extreme in the GOP. At this point they'd much rather have people without any content expertise in positions of power so long as they toe the ideological line. And the ideological line is increasingly out of touch with professional consensus in many of these sectors. It's politics for the sake of their own politics, power for the sake of power.

    Feel free to delve into similar pitfalls of the DNC, that'll be pages of content. I'll still gladly stand by my OP that the GOP now openly celebrates mocking the consensus of persons with expertise in a given field. They literally celebrate their own stupidity and are too politicized to see it. But it makes it damn hard for moderates to vote right of centre. Argue politics all day, but most people don't want to knowingly vote for an idiot.

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  • Bendit
    replied
    Happy Canada Day everyone...



    Leave a comment:


  • slaw
    replied
    Bendit wrote: View Post
    A powerful essay about the US confederate monuments ... and their unpleasant meaning for many


    By Caroline Randall Williams
    • June 26, 2020
    NASHVILLE — I have rape-colored skin. My light-brown-blackness is a living testament to the rules, the practices, the causes of the Old South.

    If there are those who want to remember the legacy of the Confederacy, if they want monuments, well, then, my body is a monument. My skin is a monument.

    Dead Confederates are honored all over this country — with cartoonish private statues, solemn public monuments and even in the names of United States Army bases. It fortifies and heartens me to witness the protests against this practice and the growing clamor from serious, nonpartisan public servants to redress it. But there are still those — like President Trump and the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell — who cannot understand the difference between rewriting and reframing the past. I say it is not a matter of “airbrushing” history, but of adding a new perspective.

    I am a black, Southern woman, and of my immediate white male ancestors, all of them were rapists. My very existence is a relic of slavery and Jim Crow.
    According to the rule of hypodescent (the social and legal practice of assigning a genetically mixed-race person to the race with less social power) I am the daughter of two black people, the granddaughter of four black people, the great-granddaughter of eight black people. Go back one more generation and it gets less straightforward, and more sinister. As far as family history has always told, and as modern DNA testing has allowed me to confirm, I am the descendant of black women who were domestic servants and white men who raped their help.

    It is an extraordinary truth of my life that I am biologically more than half white, and yet I have no white people in my genealogy in living memory. No. Voluntary. Whiteness. I am more than half white, and none of it was consensual. White Southern men — my ancestors — took what they wanted from women they did not love, over whom they had extraordinary power, and then failed to claim their children.

    What is a monument but a standing memory? An artifact to make tangible the truth of the past. My body and blood are a tangible truth of the South and its past. The black people I come from were owned by the white people I come from. The white people I come from fought and died for their Lost Cause. And I ask you now, who dares to tell me to celebrate them? Who dares to ask me to accept their mounted pedestals?

    You cannot dismiss me as someone who doesn’t understand. You cannot say it wasn’t my family members who fought and died. My blackness does not put me on the other side of anything. It puts me squarely at the heart of the debate. I don’t just come from the South. I come from Confederates. I’ve got rebel-gray blue blood coursing my veins. My great-grandfather Will was raised with the knowledge that Edmund Pettus was his father. Pettus, the storied Confederate general, the grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, the man for whom Selma’s Bloody Sunday Bridge is named. So I am not an outsider who makes these demands. I am a great-great-granddaughter.

    And here I’m called to say that there is much about the South that is precious to me. I do my best teaching and writing here. There is, however, a peculiar model of Southern pride that must now, at long last, be reckoned with.

    This is not an ignorant pride but a defiant one. It is a pride that says, “Our history is rich, our causes are justified, our ancestors lie beyond reproach.” It is a pining for greatness, if you will, a wish again for a certain kind of American memory. A monument-worthy memory.

    But here’s the thing: Our ancestors don’t deserve your unconditional pride. Yes, I am proud of every one of my black ancestors who survived slavery. They earned that pride, by any decent person’s reckoning. But I am not proud of the white ancestors whom I know, by virtue of my very existence, to be bad actors.

    Among the apologists for the Southern cause and for its monuments, there are those who dismiss the hardships of the past. They imagine a world of benevolent masters, and speak with misty eyes of gentility and honor and the land. They deny plantation rape, or explain it away, or question the degree of frequency with which it occurred.

    To those people it is my privilege to say, I am proof. I am proof that whatever else the South might have been, or might believe itself to be, it was and is a space whose prosperity and sense of romance and nostalgia were built upon the grievous exploitation of black life.

    The dream version of the Old South never existed. Any manufactured monument to that time in that place tells half a truth at best. The ideas and ideals it purports to honor are not real. To those who have embraced these delusions: Now is the time to re-examine your position.

    Either you have been blind to a truth that my body’s story forces you to see, or you really do mean to honor the oppressors at the expense of the oppressed, and you must at last acknowledge your emotional investment in a legacy of hate.

    Either way, I say the monuments of stone and metal, the monuments of cloth and wood, all the man-made monuments, must come down. I defy any sentimental Southerner to defend our ancestors to me. I am quite literally made of the reasons to strip them of their laurels.


    Caroline Randall Williams (@caroranwill) is the author of “Lucy Negro, Redux” and “Soul Food Love,” and a writer in residence at Vanderbilt University.
    Remember, when the Maoists destroyed the four olds, no one was more on board than the self styled Chinese intelligentsia. The more things change.....

    Leave a comment:


  • slaw
    replied
    S.R. wrote: View Post

    The GOP now has a real anti-expertise bent in all fields. It's dumbed down politics appealing to the lowest common denominator in their base for cheap political points. It's a fundamental problem for right wing American politics.
    Dude, the Democrats think there are more than two sexes and that fetuses aren’t people. You cannot lecture anyone about being anti science or expertise.

    Leave a comment:


  • S.R.
    replied
    slaw wrote: View Post

    Um, a group of experts does not know what is best for everyone. On the pandemic alone, remember, those same experts told you that closing the borders was racist, masks didn't work, Covid-19 was not a risk, and to go celebrate Chinese New Year bigot! Politicians listened to all that advice and ended up having to shut down their cities.

    Also, more generally, even when they weren't wrong or blinded by their bias, you would be in for a lot of very nasty, unpleasant surprises if you let technocrats make all the decisions. Just by way of one example, in a technocracy, you would not have a constitution or a bill of rights.
    The GOP now has a real anti-expertise bent in all fields. It's dumbed down politics appealing to the lowest common denominator in their base for cheap political points. It's a fundamental problem for right wing American politics.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joey
    replied
    S.R. wrote: View Post
    Really hope Canadian CP picks somebody solid. Give people a choice.
    Image

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  • Joey
    replied
    slaw wrote: View Post

    Um, a group of experts does not know what is best for everyone. On the pandemic alone, remember, those same experts told you that closing the borders was racist, masks didn't work, Covid-19 was not a risk, and to go celebrate Chinese New Year bigot! Politicians listened to all that advice and ended up having to shut down their cities.

    Also, more generally, even when they weren't wrong or blinded by their bias, you would be in for a lot of very nasty, unpleasant surprises if you let technocrats make all the decisions. Just by way of one example, in a technocracy, you would not have a constitution or a bill of rights.
    I think you and Rand Paul are partly right ... which, at least in regards to Rand fucking Paul, is super painful for me to say. Lol

    In the case of epidemiologists, they kinda sorta DO know whats best for everyone, at least insofar as it comes to global pandemics, BUT they don't know the best way to implement it on legislative level.

    That is why politicians should be listening the experts, but then implementing legislation based on, and weighing against the recommendations of countless other advisors/experts. That's what being a good politician is to me, is be able to make the "right" decision, while considering ALL of the information. I put "right" in quotes because that answer is different depending on the constituents you represent.

    So, no, experts should not be relied on do Rand Pauls job. That's correct. But they should be relied on to their job - which the GOP obviously undermines on the daily.

    Leave a comment:


  • slaw
    replied
    S.R. wrote: View Post
    Will the GOP ever recover, they are currently an absolute clusterfuck: https://twitter.com/kylegriffin1/sta...054877697?s=19

    Most important thing for a healthy democracy is at least 2 quality choices. Party leadership is huge. Really hope Canadian CP picks somebody solid. Give people a choice.
    Um, a group of experts does not know what is best for everyone. On the pandemic alone, remember, those same experts told you that closing the borders was racist, masks didn't work, Covid-19 was not a risk, and to go celebrate Chinese New Year bigot! Politicians listened to all that advice and ended up having to shut down their cities.

    Also, more generally, even when they weren't wrong or blinded by their bias, you would be in for a lot of very nasty, unpleasant surprises if you let technocrats make all the decisions. Just by way of one example, in a technocracy, you would not have a constitution or a bill of rights.

    Leave a comment:


  • S.R.
    replied
    Will the GOP ever recover, they are currently an absolute clusterfuck: https://twitter.com/kylegriffin1/sta...054877697?s=19

    Most important thing for a healthy democracy is at least 2 quality choices. Party leadership is huge. Really hope Canadian CP picks somebody solid. Give people a choice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bendit
    replied
    A powerful essay about the US confederate monuments ... and their unpleasant meaning for many


    By Caroline Randall Williams
    • June 26, 2020
    NASHVILLE — I have rape-colored skin. My light-brown-blackness is a living testament to the rules, the practices, the causes of the Old South.

    If there are those who want to remember the legacy of the Confederacy, if they want monuments, well, then, my body is a monument. My skin is a monument.

    Dead Confederates are honored all over this country — with cartoonish private statues, solemn public monuments and even in the names of United States Army bases. It fortifies and heartens me to witness the protests against this practice and the growing clamor from serious, nonpartisan public servants to redress it. But there are still those — like President Trump and the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell — who cannot understand the difference between rewriting and reframing the past. I say it is not a matter of “airbrushing” history, but of adding a new perspective.

    I am a black, Southern woman, and of my immediate white male ancestors, all of them were rapists. My very existence is a relic of slavery and Jim Crow.
    According to the rule of hypodescent (the social and legal practice of assigning a genetically mixed-race person to the race with less social power) I am the daughter of two black people, the granddaughter of four black people, the great-granddaughter of eight black people. Go back one more generation and it gets less straightforward, and more sinister. As far as family history has always told, and as modern DNA testing has allowed me to confirm, I am the descendant of black women who were domestic servants and white men who raped their help.

    It is an extraordinary truth of my life that I am biologically more than half white, and yet I have no white people in my genealogy in living memory. No. Voluntary. Whiteness. I am more than half white, and none of it was consensual. White Southern men — my ancestors — took what they wanted from women they did not love, over whom they had extraordinary power, and then failed to claim their children.

    What is a monument but a standing memory? An artifact to make tangible the truth of the past. My body and blood are a tangible truth of the South and its past. The black people I come from were owned by the white people I come from. The white people I come from fought and died for their Lost Cause. And I ask you now, who dares to tell me to celebrate them? Who dares to ask me to accept their mounted pedestals?

    You cannot dismiss me as someone who doesn’t understand. You cannot say it wasn’t my family members who fought and died. My blackness does not put me on the other side of anything. It puts me squarely at the heart of the debate. I don’t just come from the South. I come from Confederates. I’ve got rebel-gray blue blood coursing my veins. My great-grandfather Will was raised with the knowledge that Edmund Pettus was his father. Pettus, the storied Confederate general, the grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, the man for whom Selma’s Bloody Sunday Bridge is named. So I am not an outsider who makes these demands. I am a great-great-granddaughter.

    And here I’m called to say that there is much about the South that is precious to me. I do my best teaching and writing here. There is, however, a peculiar model of Southern pride that must now, at long last, be reckoned with.

    This is not an ignorant pride but a defiant one. It is a pride that says, “Our history is rich, our causes are justified, our ancestors lie beyond reproach.” It is a pining for greatness, if you will, a wish again for a certain kind of American memory. A monument-worthy memory.

    But here’s the thing: Our ancestors don’t deserve your unconditional pride. Yes, I am proud of every one of my black ancestors who survived slavery. They earned that pride, by any decent person’s reckoning. But I am not proud of the white ancestors whom I know, by virtue of my very existence, to be bad actors.

    Among the apologists for the Southern cause and for its monuments, there are those who dismiss the hardships of the past. They imagine a world of benevolent masters, and speak with misty eyes of gentility and honor and the land. They deny plantation rape, or explain it away, or question the degree of frequency with which it occurred.

    To those people it is my privilege to say, I am proof. I am proof that whatever else the South might have been, or might believe itself to be, it was and is a space whose prosperity and sense of romance and nostalgia were built upon the grievous exploitation of black life.

    The dream version of the Old South never existed. Any manufactured monument to that time in that place tells half a truth at best. The ideas and ideals it purports to honor are not real. To those who have embraced these delusions: Now is the time to re-examine your position.

    Either you have been blind to a truth that my body’s story forces you to see, or you really do mean to honor the oppressors at the expense of the oppressed, and you must at last acknowledge your emotional investment in a legacy of hate.

    Either way, I say the monuments of stone and metal, the monuments of cloth and wood, all the man-made monuments, must come down. I defy any sentimental Southerner to defend our ancestors to me. I am quite literally made of the reasons to strip them of their laurels.


    Caroline Randall Williams (@caroranwill) is the author of “Lucy Negro, Redux” and “Soul Food Love,” and a writer in residence at Vanderbilt University.

    Leave a comment:

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