Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Space Thread

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76

    Comment


    • #77
      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...014d3fe2435b5?

      carl sagan is the man. his voice just seems perfect for enunciation.

      Comment


      • #78
        SpaceX rocket landing on sea pad.

        Pretty damn good achievement. Another feather for Elon Tusk.


        http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slate...bot_barge.html

        Comment


        • #79
          Bendit wrote: View Post
          Pretty damn good achievement. Another feather for Elon Tusk.


          http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slate...bot_barge.html
          The only thing left to do is pre-order your Model 3

          Comment


          • #80
            Nilanka wrote: View Post
            The only thing left to do is pre-order your Model 3
            Haha...I think I'll wait...as I am with Windows 10!!...let them get the bugs out. Since the car seems to work like an internet bot is it hacker-proof? Doubt it. I cant even get "real" high speed where I live....so there is that too...how would I pre-order my latte on the way to the city?

            Comment


            • #81
              .

              Comment


              • #82
                https://www.yahoo.com/tech/theres-st...170532553.html

                this is pretty awesome. just a tiny little probe off to alpha centauri, in 20 years

                Comment


                • #83
                  Miekenstien wrote: View Post
                  https://www.yahoo.com/tech/theres-st...170532553.html

                  this is pretty awesome. just a tiny little probe off to alpha centauri, in 20 years
                  Was going to post about this actually ... really amazing that these people with money have come together and said, "enough is enough, lets see what we can really do."

                  The Solar Sail has been the stuff of theoretical science fiction for the longest time, and to finally see the concept potentially be put into use is just too much ... really awesome stuff.
                  Last edited by Joey; Wed Apr 13th, 2016, 12:58 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Joey wrote: View Post
                    Was going to post about this actually ... really amazing that these people with money have come together and said, "enough is enough, lets see what we can really do."

                    The Solar Sail has been the stuff of theoretical science fiction for the longest time, and to finally see the concept potentially be put into use is just too much ... really awesome stuff.
                    http://gizmodo.com/the-space-tech-of...kin-1770590753
                    http://gizmodo.com/hawking-an-inters...185.1452143297

                    couple more articles. the probe looks tiny. maybe able to make some atmospheric measurings, simple photos? no idea. but a giant giant leap forward. my favourite stat is the 3 days to pluto. that's how long our moon flights last now and our pluto satellites take 9 years. it could be further out than vger in a week.

                    20 years there, barring no catastrophic damage, 4.3 years for messages back. i'm in my 50s with pictures, maybe, of another solar system that aren't artistic renderings. just incredible.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      it would take about 3 days for the spacecraft to reach Pluto, a destination that took the New Horizons spacecraft 9 years to reach.
                      This is amazing. It took Voyager 12.5 years.

                      If they perfect this sort of thing just think about how easy it would be to send supplies to Mars mission? I also wonder would this one day be utilized on manned space craft and how fast could the human body tolerate in space? I know it would be much slower than that.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Apollo wrote: View Post
                        This is amazing. It took Voyager 12.5 years.

                        If they perfect this sort of thing just think about how easy it would be to send supplies to Mar mission? I also wonder would this one day be utilized on manned space craft and how fast could the human body tolerate in space? I know it would be much slower than that.
                        Why does the human body have to go though? Pride?

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          SkywalkerAC wrote: View Post
                          Why does the human body have to go though? Pride?
                          Survival. Do you realize how many mass extinctions that have occurred on earth? It makes sense to colonize space. Pride has nothing to do with it.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Apollo wrote: View Post
                            This is amazing. It took Voyager 12.5 years.

                            If they perfect this sort of thing just think about how easy it would be to send supplies to Mars mission? I also wonder would this one day be utilized on manned space craft and how fast could the human body tolerate in space? I know it would be much slower than that.
                            Because there is no Gravity in Interstellar space, I don't imagine there is any limit to the speeds the Human Body can tolerate out there. I could be very wrong, but given there is no Gravity, no Air Resistance, etc. I imagine moving 100 million miles per hour in space would feel the same as moving 10 miles per hour.

                            I think the thing that really needs to be considered, is when you are moving at those speeds, you have basically no time at all to adjust your course if, for example, you are heading toward space debris, dust particles etc .. which could theoretically mess things up pretty massively when moving at those speeds.

                            But still, moving at 20% of the speed of light, seems relatively "achievable" when you consider that most people probably expect Warp Drives and Worm Holes etc. for moving about out there.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              SkywalkerAC wrote: View Post
                              Why does the human body have to go though? Pride?
                              It is Human Instinct to long for bigger & better things for our offspring.
                              What could be bigger and better than a "SuperHabitable" world that they are hypothesizing exists orbiting Alpha Centauri A?

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Joey wrote: View Post
                                Because there is no Gravity in Interstellar space, I don't imagine there is any limit to the speeds the Human Body can tolerate out there. I could be very wrong, but given there is no Gravity, no Air Resistance, etc. I imagine moving 100 million miles per hour in space would feel the same as moving 10 miles per hour.

                                I think the thing that really needs to be considered, is when you are moving at those speeds, you have basically no time at all to adjust your course if, for example, you are heading toward space debris, dust particles etc .. which could theoretically mess things up pretty massively when moving at those speeds.

                                But still, moving at 20% of the speed of light, seems relatively "achievable" when you consider that most people probably expect Warp Drives and Worm Holes etc. for moving about out there.
                                Right off NASA's website. It's 16 years old and is off the beaten path(thanks Google):
                                QUESTION:
                                How much speed can a body's organs take in space?

                                ANSWER from Bruce Thompson on September 20, 2000:
                                The question is not how much speed the body can take, but rather, how much
                                *acceleration*. It has long been known that speed alone has no effect on our
                                organism. Accelerations, on the other hand, can cause severe injuries, as any
                                paramedic attending a road smash knows.

                                The study of the effects of acceleration on the body began towards the the
                                end of World War I, when aircraft were becoming robust enough to perform
                                violent aerial manoeuvres without falling apart in mid-air. Pilots reported
                                that those same manoeuvres were giving them temporary vision problems, as
                                well as making them feel heavier or lighter, depending on what their aircraft
                                were doing at the time. Over the decades that followed, an understanding was
                                developed of so-called g-forces and their effects on the body. When space
                                flight began, a new element - that of weightlessness - was added to the
                                research.

                                The human body can endure any speed in space, or on Earth, but the time taken
                                to reach that speed is governed, among other things, by the body's ability to
                                withstand the forces of acceleration.

                                Every moment of our lives is subject to an acceleration of one sort or
                                another. In a car, we feel the bumps and irregularities in the road by the
                                small vertical accelerations they impose on the car, and when the car turns a
                                corner, we tend to lean over, because our bodies are trying to continue in a
                                straight line, while the car's turning imposes a sideways acceleration on us.
                                When the car brakes, we lean forward, because the car is decelerating.
                                Talking about "acceleration" and "deceleration" at the same time might sound
                                confusing, but they are describing the same thing - a change in velocity;
                                either faster or slower.

                                Even when we are sitting in a chair, we are still subject to the constant
                                acceleration of the Earth's gravity. It is trying to pull us down at 32 feet
                                per second squared, but whatever we are sitting on, or standing on, stops us,
                                so we stick to that surface. Take away that surface and gravitational
                                acceleration takes over, until we encounter another surface, at which point,
                                deceleration takes place.

                                In space, a space ship in orbit around the Earth is travelling at 17,000
                                miles per hour. The crew inside the space ship are also travelling at the
                                same speed, so they feel no forces acting on them. However, in reaching that
                                speed, the space ship and crew had to accelerate from stationary, on the
                                ground, to orbital speed in only a few minutes.

                                In the case of the Space Shuttle, this acceleration is around 3 times the
                                force of gravity - 3g - making the crew feel three times their normal weight,
                                but in the early days of manned space flight, the astronauts had a rougher
                                ride. The Mercury capsules launched by the Atlas booster reached a peak
                                acceleration of 8g during ascent to orbit, then decelerated during re-entry
                                at loads as high as 7.8g. The Titan rockets launched the Geminis at 7.25g,
                                and the Saturn 5 peaked at 4g. However, the Apollo capsules returning from
                                the Moon re-entered the atmosphere at over 6g.

                                The highest acceleration/deceleration that a human volunteer has been
                                subjected to was in an experimental sled called the "Daisy Decelerator", used
                                in the 1970s to study the effects of sudden deceleration - violent braking,
                                that is - on the human body. A Major Beeding experienced a sudden
                                deceleration with a peak force of 83g, lasting 0.04 of a second. Major
                                Beeding was subjected to the same force when his rocket sled accelerated as
                                he was when it decelerated, but because it was more gradual, the
                                rocket-powered acceleration was more gentle than the violent brick-wall
                                deceleration at the other end. The Daisy Decelerator experiments were
                                carefully controlled, with the health of the human subjects always taking
                                priority.

                                The following terms have been adopted for various kinds of acceleration:
                                impact acceleration. less than 0.2 of a second; abrupt acceleration, 0.2-2
                                seconds, brief acceleration, 2-10 seconds; long term acceleration, 10-60
                                seconds; and prolonged acceleration, more than 60 seconds.

                                The human body can tolerate violent accelerations for short periods,
                                including the the prolonged high-g acceleration necessary to reach Earth
                                orbit. However very prolonged periods of high-g acceleration during travel
                                between planets would be very harmful to the body, and therefore out of the
                                question. Imagine travelling to Mars, accelerating all the way at 3
                                gravities. You would weight three times your normal weight for the duration
                                of the trip and would barely be able to move, but what would the unrelenting
                                acceleration be doing to your body? Heavy acceleration is a speeded-up aging
                                process. Tissues break down, capillaries break down and the heart has to do
                                many times its proper work. You could not count on being in good shape when
                                you arrived.

                                In his 1953 short story, "Sky Lift", Robert Heinlein explored the effects on
                                the body of several days of space travel at accelerations as high as four
                                gravities. The effects were not pleasant.
                                http://quest.nasa.gov/saturn/qa/new/...n_the_body.txt

                                When I posed the question I said "fast" but I was thinking about G's, acceleration. Anyway, this was educational.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X